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Echo Giants Freeze Mage TGT Wild Deck

Last updated on Sep 09, 2015 at 15:55 by Sottle 25 comments

Table of Contents

The following guide details a Freeze Mage variant that uses Molten Giants as its win condition as opposed to large quantities of burn spells. It is a relatively old archetype but has been used recently to great success by neviilz, and has found its way back into the meta due to favourable matchups against Face Hunter and Grim Patron Warrior

The Grand Tournament introduces a second win-condition into the deck, with the addition of Frost Giant. This inclusion can be extremely important for winning games in which your opponent does not put you under enough pressure to activate your Molten Giants, or simply chooses to play around them deliberately.

1. About the Author

This deck is presented to you by Sottle, a professional Hearthstone player who plays for compLexity Gaming. Sottle regularly streams on Twitch and explains all of his moves. Watching him is a good opportunity to see how this and other decks play out in practice, and how decisions are made in real time.

2. Echo Giants Freeze Mage TGT Wild Deck

Our deck costs 7,780 Arcane Dust and it is made up of the following cards.

Mage Cards Neutral Cards

2.1. Mana Curve

0
0
6
8
3
5
2
6

3. Strategy

Giants Mage is a variant of Freeze Mage that aims to win through masses of Molten Giants. Freeze Mage can suffer against some matchups that actually run out the amount of damage in the deck, so Giants Mage aims to mitigate this problem by replacing the limited amount of burn with Giants that represent an infinite amount of damage if your opponent is unable to remove them.

The early game turns will usually play out very similarly to Freeze Mage, with you simply getting Mad Scientists into play, and beginning to cycle cards with Arcane Intellect. Since this deck does not play the spot removal cards like Frostbolt, you can often find yourself under significant pressure early, which makes Explosive Sheep another very important card.

Moving forward into the mid-game, this deck becomes more proactive. You can start to try and fight for the board actively with cards like Sludge Belcher and Sylvanas Windrunner. This is usually the period where Mage decks of this style use Frost Nova + Doomsayer freely to clear the board, however in this deck you need to be a lot more greedy with your Freeze effects, since Frost Nova is often crucial in the late-game to set up your eventual huge Giant turn. To mitigate this, you should look for other opportunities to sneak in a Doomsayer without Freezing the board, even if it is guaranteed to die, and simply functions to gain you some life while they kill it.

Duplicate is a key card in the deck and is important to learn how to use correctly. Once you have a Duplicate in play, you need to be very careful about which cards you Duplicate, and refrain from playing low value minions that your opponent can target in order to give you little value. The targets that are good to duplicate in almost any matchup are Sludge Belcher and Sylvanas Windrunner, and slowing down for a turn to load up a Duplicate with the intention of playing one of those cards on the following turn is usually fine. However, there are alternate targets that are fantastic to Duplicate against other decks, such as Antique Healbot against Face Hunter, or Big Game Hunter against Handlock or Control Warrior.

Emperor Thaurissan is another key mid-game card that can potentially set up victory for you. Dropping this card on an empty board should be a big goal when playing the deck. For example, although your Frost Novas are extremely valuable, as stated earlier, using a Frost Nova + Doomsayer combo on turn 5 to set up playing Thaurissan on an empty board on turn 6 is usually the correct play. Even if you cannot set up this perfect scenario, slowing down for a turn to play Thaurissan is usually worth it, since you can regain the lost Tempo in the following turns with your discounted cards.

Using your life as a resource is key to the deck, and is a huge reason that Ice Barrier is left out of the deck. You want your life to reach a low enough total in order to activate your Molten Giants, with the eventual goal of the deck being to be able to play both Molten Giants, and then cast Echo of Medivh to generate even more Giants. The most powerful thing you can do with this mechanic is to be at 10 or less HP and play Molten Giant, Molten Giant, Sunfury Protector, Echo Of Medivh, Molten Giant, Molten Giant, Sunfury Protector. This entire combination costs only 8 Mana, and loads 36 points of attack, 38 points of Health, and 32 points of Taunt onto the board. As you might expect, this situation is nearly impossible for an opposing deck to deal with, especially if you also have an Ice Block in play and are unable to die to burn spells past your Taunts.

If you are unable to activate the Giants Echo combo with a Sunfury Protector will full safety, you can instead use a Frost Nova on the same turn to provide you with the extra turn you need for your Giants to dominate the game. You should consider the possibility of Charge minions in your opponent's deck before making this play though, especially if you do not already have an Ice Block in play.

It is important when planning out these sorts of turns that you aware of your opponent's possibilities for dealing with your board. For example, Priests can use Lightbomb to answer any number of Giants, and Warriors have a similar spell in Brawl. Against these classes, and others, it is best to simply play enough Giants that they are forced to use these spells, and keep your Echo'd Giants in your hand to refill the board afterwards.

One of the ways that this strategy can be stopped, is if your opponent gets a good read on which type of deck you are playing, and chooses to play around Molten Giants by never attacking you. By doing this, they essentially leave you without a win condition in your deck, and slowly leave you to die. The Grand Tournament introduces Frost Giant into the deck, which can be used as an alternate jumping off point for Echo of Medivh if your opponent is refusing to activate your Moltens.

To help you to sustain until this point, the deck plays multiple survival cards such as Alexstrasza, Ice Block and Antique Healbot. These cards in combination can help you to engineer your Molten Giant turn, and be able to bounce back to safety afterwards. As mentioned earlier, your life is an important resource in this deck, and you need to learn when it is correct to allow your opponent to push you low, and when you need to simply survive with Antique Healbot and put off your Giants until later. If you have an Ice Block in play, you are usually safe to allow your opponent to wear you down, and then use the Healbot to recover after your Giants are in play. If not, then you are more likely to need to heal and survive and wait for the game to progress further.

3.1. Synergies & Combinations

Echo of Medivh is the key combo card in the deck, and be used to create huge boards of Molten Giants, or to create additional copies of key matchup cards like Big Game Hunter or Antique Healbot.

Frost Nova + Doomsayer is a powerful board clearing tool that will wipe your opponent's board if they do not have direct removal from hand for the Doomsayer.

3.2. Mulligans & Matchup Specific Strategies

In every matchup you will look to Mulligan for Mad Scientist and Arcane Intellect, with Doomsayer and Explosive Sheep also being possible keeps in certain matchups. More involved matchup strategies can be found below.

3.2.1. Vs. Hunter

Against Hunter you should Mulligan more aggressively for Doomsayer and Explosive Sheep alongside the usual Mad Scientist. Playing out Doomsayer early against Hunter can guarantee you a free board to play Arcane Intellect under no pressure on the following turn. Against Face Hunter you are highly favoured due to the amount of healing and Taunt in the deck. Midrange and Hybrid Hunters are slightly more difficult, but still very winnable. Leveraging your Sylvanas Windrunner and Polymorph well against their Savannah Highmanes are key to your victory

3.2.2. Vs. Warlock

Against an unknown Warlock you should keep Explosive Sheep, Mad Scientist, Doomsayer and Big Game Hunter. Big Game Hunter is a key card against the possibility of Handlock, while the other cards allow you fight back against the fast starts of Zoo.

Zoo is a very straightforward matchup against for this deck. Much like when playing Handlock, Zoo has no way of answering a board of 8/8 Taunts, meaning you simply need to engineer and stall the game with your removal and healing until you can setup such a board.

Handlock is a slightly trickier matchup, and you will have to keep the combination of Molten Giant and Shadowflame in mind when you are building your own board of Giants. This is one of the matchups where you are often better off holding some Giants back after your Echo of Medivh to test for the above combination. Having said that, many Handlocks are currently only running one Shadowflame, so if you have already seen it used, you can choose to go all-in if you prefer.

3.2.3. Vs. Warrior

Against Warrior you should Mulligan normally for Mad Scientist and Arcane Intellect. There are two main types of Warrior you can encounter, Control Warrior and Grim Patron Warrior. Grim Patron Warrior is a very strong matchup for this deck, as you have Flamestrike in order to answer even the biggest of Grim Patron boards. Also of note is the fact that they only play two removal spells in the form of Execute and rarely run Brawl, which makes your eventual Giants board very resilient.

Control Warrior is a tricker matchup, but is much more favoured for this deck than for regular Freeze Mage. They key to victory is playing just enough Giants that they are forced to Brawl, but you still have enough Giants in reserve to refill the board. Duplicating Big Game Hunter can also have a lot of merit in this matchup.

3.2.4. Vs. Paladin

There is not too much to mention in this matchup, aside from the fact that they have access to a full board clear in the form of Equality + Consecration, which must be kept in mind when considering how many Molten Giants to play.

3.2.5. Vs. Priest

As above, the only major concern in this matchup is Lightbomb, which can answer any board of Molten Giants. You should test the waters with a limited amount of Giants before committing your full board.

3.3. Card Swaps

One Duplicate can be cut from the deck for an Acolyte of Pain to increase the consistency of your draws.

One Ice Barrier can also be included in this spot in you are facing a lot of particularly aggressive decks.

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