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Blizzard Sues Honnorbudy Creator for $8.74 Mio

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Please note that the use of third-party software (also known as "bots") is against the ToS and will get your account suspended. This article is purely informative and doesn't promote botting in any way.

Blizzard has filed a motion for default judgment against Bossland, the creator of third-party automation software (also knowns as bots) and the company demands a total sum of $8,740,235.41 for damages caused by the creator. 

  • Bossland is well-known for creating bots for every Blizzard title
  • According to the motion, the bot creator sold 42,818 copies of bots in the US and Blizzard estimates a single violation (sold copy) to be worth $200

More details are available over at Torrentfreak.

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This is a follow up to our previous post, where we wrote about Blizzard winning a lawsuit against Honorbuddy. Let's hope this one ends good for Blizzard, so we can all enjoy a fair gaming environment and normalized AH prices!

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They should have sued for more than the minimum, like triple damages or something. As long as they can prove (which they can) that it's degrade the gaming experience than they could easily get more than the minimum amount of $.

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3 hours ago, YourGod said:

They should have sued for more than the minimum, like triple damages or something. As long as they can prove (which they can) that it's degrade the gaming experience than they could easily get more than the minimum amount of $.

You're right ofcourse, but I really appreciate the fact that they, in fact, demanded a very reasonable sum. Blizzard therefore (probably knowingly) shows all of their fans and audience that it's not about the money but about fair play in all their games. This sum is negligible for Blizzard as a whole, but the symbolism is huge. You can't get away with cheating in Blizzard games anymore. They will get you in the long run. They are doing something about it, for all of us out there.

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Naga please! Botters didn't cost Blizzard a penny!  In fact Blizzard made money cause even though they were bots the owner of the bot still had to buy the game, all the expansions and pay the $15.00 per month!

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1 hour ago, multiboxing said:

Naga please! Botters didn't cost Blizzard a penny!  In fact Blizzard made money cause even though they were bots the owner of the bot still had to buy the game, all the expansions and pay the $15.00 per month!

Says "multiboxing"...how many bots do you own? probably use the flying bots too. Also if you really think botters that make millions of gold are not going to pay a paltry 92k gold (or whatever the token price is atm) then you are talking out of the wrong end, or incredibly naive.

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6 minutes ago, Conso said:

Says "multiboxing"...how many bots do you own? probably use the flying bots too. Also if you really think botters that make millions of gold are not going to pay a paltry 92k gold (or whatever the token price is atm) then you are talking out of the wrong end, or incredibly naive.

But someone would still have to buy the WoW TokenWoW Token in order for the bot to be able to buy it. So, Blizzard still does make money.

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11 hours ago, Conso said:

Says "multiboxing"...how many bots do you own? probably use the flying bots too. Also if you really think botters that make millions of gold are not going to pay a paltry 92k gold (or whatever the token price is atm) then you are talking out of the wrong end, or incredibly naive.

I understand your point, but you can't ignore the fact that theoretically, Blizzard lost alot of subcribers just because they were unable to compete in a botting-environment. Their game basically is infiltrated with players (bots) who don't behave the way real players do. Which makes it an unfair environment. Alot of people feel at a disadvantage and the game as a whole is less appealing. That's a tough fact to explain in monetary figures, but it's misuse of property.

(also, I realize I quoted the wrong person. But my point stands)

Edited by Skyewalker
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I think it is about money. We can assume they lost or gained money from the botting but in both cases it is not a sum which bothers Blizzard. They are simply defending their products as every company would.

But Blizzards game quality is compared to other game publishers/designers a lot better. There are still issues of course and they are a company as any other and they want to make money. Electronic Arts throws a new game every five minutes, Blizzard only has a few games and they prefer quality over quantity. This makes customers happy and in the long run more money for blizz.

Money may not be the only or not even the first reason for this but it is about money. Anyway providing a good game experience to their customers while making money with it is fair game in my opinion :)

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I find it difficult to believe any player would ever defend the existence of bots.

The core concept behind World of Warcraft and every MMO worth its salt is growth - through one's character, specifically - in a controlled environment. Everything players do - from questing to raiding to PvP'ing to achievement hunting - has this underlying goal, whether or not players are able or willing to acknowledge it.

The presence of bots directly contradicts this core tenet of the game's design and appeal. Growth also happens to be relative; when players feel like the time they invest into the game is not competitive, they move on. And although the concern of quitting players is ever present, Blizzard's move is much more than about making some amount of money; it's about protecting its legacy.

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I think it's something that had to happen sooner or later. Botters are a huge problem, and bans won't fix all of it. Let's hope this ends well for Blizz.

Keep us informed on this topic, please.

 

Edited by Skytea

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On 3/17/2017 at 10:48 PM, MrEdren said:

I'm no lawyer, but I'm not seeing how they can assign a value greater than the retail price to each copy.  

They took the number of copies of the bot sold in the US x the cost of a lifetime license, which is cheaper than paying the monthly license over time.

 

Blizzard should win, considering Bossland (company behind the bots) has failed to respond to the lawsuit or a judges order to respond. Should just be a formality since it will be a default judgement, which 99% of the time is in favor of the plaintiff, provided they are reasonable in their request. The last I heard, the judge rules April 27th.

Edited by Venomize
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