Damien

Hearthstone Mage Miracle Gadgetzan BrM

Sign in to follow this  

13 posts in this topic

This thread is for comments about our Miracle Gadgetzan Mage deck for BrM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice build :-) since i dont have the Archmage and Bloodmage i am using Flameblast and Pyroblast instead and it is going quite well :-)

Edited by Tashev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would including Malygos instead of 1 auctioneer be any good you think or is it all to slow?

Im thinking like the dragon malygos warlock deck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have him & always replace him with Kolbold Geomancer. Same mana cost & same spell damage, instead of drawing a card, which is a bummer, you get 1 extra attack & 1 extra health.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miracle is a name that's given to decks that aim to draw a ton of cards with Gadgetzan, it comes from the original "Miracle Rogue", which I believe in turn took the name from a Magic the Gathering deck. Basically, you play Gadgetzan, and then miracles happen :P

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. Yes, now you've come to mention it I've had folks do that to me. You can't help but sit and say 'Well isn't that just a gosh-darn miracle". Or something like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miracle is a name that's given to decks that aim to draw a ton of cards with Gadgetzan, it comes from the original "Miracle Rogue", which I believe in turn took the name from a Magic the Gathering deck. Basically, you play Gadgetzan, and then miracles happen tongue.png

Yea the MtG deck was called "Miracle Grow" after the brand of plant fertilizers. It was called that because it was based around a card called Quirion Dryad which grew +1/+1 every time you played a spell which wasn't black I believe. The deck was designed to grow your Dryads to gigantic sizes. Hence the name. I

 

From what I understand the original miracle Rogue decks were based around Questing Adventurer and van Cleef since they are the natural Hearthstone counterpart to this card, but obviously people figured out that Auctioneer alone was enough to carry the deck archetype.

Edited by Raiden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question- is this deck viable in Standard minus the GvG cards- here are my replacements

 

2x Forgotten torch replace 1x flamecannon and 1x unstable portal

1x shatter or 1x arcane blast replace 1x unstable portal (shatter- same cost spell and great removal with the various freeze cards; arcane blast- another 1 cost spell that goes well with Bloodmage Thalnos/Kobold Geomancer or the azure drakes)

2x water elemental replace 2x mechanical yeti (synergises with ice lance and same mana cost)

 

Your thoughts guys?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question- is this deck viable in Standard minus the GvG cards- here are my replacements

 

2x Forgotten torch replace 1x flamecannon and 1x unstable portal

1x shatter or 1x arcane blast replace 1x unstable portal (shatter- same cost spell and great removal with the various freeze cards; arcane blast- another 1 cost spell that goes well with Bloodmage Thalnos/Kobold Geomancer or the azure drakes)

2x water elemental replace 2x mechanical yeti (synergises with ice lance and same mana cost)

 

Your thoughts guys?

Shatter and Arcane Blast sound fine and so does the Water Ele. Not sure about the ratio of Shatters and Arcane Blasts though. From what I have seen today, one Shatter and two Arcane Blasts would be the way to go for me. However, you can have different meta, so I recommend you to experiment a little bit with the ratio and keep what brings you the better result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Zadina
      Just before the beginning of first live stream, a Paladin Secret was revealed in an official blog post.
      We keep learning more and more of the backstory of The Boomsday Project. This time around it was the second part of the Lab Logs blog, which also revealed this Paladin card:

      We haven't seen Paladin secrets played in a while, but this one might turn the tables! Autodefense Matrix is arguably a better version of Noble Sacrifice. It suffers the same fate as all Secrets, though: it's situational and it would be much better if you discovered it (for example, via Hydrologist) instead of actually including it in your deck.
      Let us know what you think about this card and don't forget to come back, since the reveal period is about to kick off with the first live stream with Brian Kibler and Peter Whalen!
    • By Zadina
      The lore of The Boomsday Project begins to unfold in this digital comic!
      Dr. Boom is the star of Hearthstone's upcoming expansion and it's time to take an inside look into his labs. What are his motivations? Who are the scientists helping him? And who is his greatest love, apart from himself? You can find all of this if you read here.

      The comic reveals the names for the Legendary minions for Hunter and Priest: Boommaster Flark and Zerek the Cloner. Their names definitely provide small hints about the card abilities. According to the reveal schedule teasers, the latter might be revealed on the 27th of July. Stay tuned, as the reveal season begins tomorrow with the reveal livestream!
    • By positiv2
      This is a list of Questions for Hearthstone sorted by their category. Any feedback and suggestions are very welcome.
      Hearthstone Common Questions
      Constructed
      Should I play Standard or Wild in Hearthstone? Economy
      Can Hearthstone daily quests be completed in Practice mode? Is there a way to trade cards with other players in Hearthstone? What are the rewards from Hearthstone Ranked Chests? What Hearthstone packs to buy? Where to get cards in Hearthstone? Where to spend gold in Hearthstone? Where to start in Hearthstone? Which Hearthstone cards to disenchant? Tavern Brawl
      When is Tavern Brawl open in Hearthstone? Technical
      Can Hearthstone be played offline? How do I multibox in Hearthstone? Why can't I use my Standard Hearthstone deck in Standard mode? Other
      Are there achievements in Hearthstone? What decides who goes first in Hearthstone? Where to change card back in Hearthstone? Which Hearthstone class is the best?
    • By positiv2
      Hearthstone's main constructed modes are Wild and Standard. While Wild allows for all cards that were released in a constructed set, Standard decks can only utilise cards that were printed during this or previous year, alongside Classic and Basic sets.
      Occasionally, a deck is not available for Standard play even when it should be. You need to make sure Standard is selected as the deckbuilding mode, as even when the deck contains only Standard cards, it has to be set to Standard before it can be used. When wild is used, the artwork for the collection changes slightly. You can change the mode when you open the deck in your collection, hover over or tap its "header" and select Convert to Standard. If the deck is already set to Standard, you will see Convert to Wild instead.

      If the deck contained any Wild cards, their colour will change to Red. These cards need to be swapped for Standard cards before the deck can be used in standard.

      If this does not help, restarting Hearthstone should fix the issue.
    • By Stan
      Here's a roundup of all Midgame Moves for Hearthstone that have been published last week. The series is aimed at educating players and covers a variety of topics.
      Table of Contents 
      Part One: Do I Have Lethal? Part Two: Am I Dead? Part Three: Reading Your Opponent Part Four: When the Plan Falls Apart Part Five: Playing to Your Outs Part One: Do I Have Lethal? [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)
      Welcome to Midgame Week! Previously, during Opening Moves Week, we looked at how Hearthstone pros navigate the first phase of the game—everything from choosing your win condition and building a deck to how to mulligan or play your first turns. In Midgame Week, we dissect the sequence of decisions a pro player makes each turn as they look to advance to the late game—and victory.
      The first question you should ask yourself every turn in the midgame is one that will come as no surprise to Hearthstone aficionados—can I win right now? Do I have lethal? To dig into that, we asked Raymond “rayC” Cipoletti of Panda Global for advice.
      “Frequently, even at the highest levels of play, we see players missing lethal,” rayC says. “Whether it’s an easy lethal or the most complex puzzle in Hearthstone, there are steps you should take every turn to ensure nothing is missed.”
      The first step? Take a deep breath. “You need to slow down,” rayC says. “The most common reason for missing lethal is simply playing too fast. Take your time to analyze the board state.”
      Once you’ve done this, run through your choices. “Think about every single option at your disposal—especially if your opponent is low on Health,” rayC says. “Go through every scenario with the cards you have in hand. You have until the rope starts to burn to make your actions, so make use of that time!”
      Accounting for your outs is important, too. “When I play any given turn, I treat it like a math problem,” rayC says. “Remember order of operations from math class? Sequencing applies to every turn of Hearthstone.” Sequencing is a skill players must work at constantly, but rayC suggests doing things like drawing cards once you’ve established you don’t already have lethal before taking any other actions.
      Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, check your work. “When you finally spot lethal, re-count it,” rayC says. “Make sure the math adds up. You never want to commit to a play only to realize you were off, and potentially lose because of it.”
      Part Two: Am I Dead? [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)

      To figure out whether your opponent is about to end the game is tricky. You have to evaluate the current board state, your opponent’s hand, what (if anything) you can do to prevent them from winning, and how that will impact your own game plan. For such a challenge, we asked the inimitable Edwin “HotMEOWTH” Cook—winner of the 2016 Americas Summer Championship—for help.
      Evaluating these variables is difficult, but sometimes your opponent will give you information. “It’s important to know when your opponent is showing signs of aggression or making riskier plays that might be setting up lethal,” HotMEOWTH says. “In a scenario where you are suspicious of your opponent setting up lethal the following turn, it’s important to track the cards they have left in their hand, cards left in their deck, and how much mana they will have available to figure out how much damage they can possibly do.”
      “One trick to find out if your opponent can kill you next turn is to track their hand and see if there are cards they have held for more than a few turns,” HotMEOWTH says. “If so, they might be holding onto dangerous burn spells or combo pieces.” (Hand-tracking is a skill unto itself, and the focus of tomorrow’s Midgame Week entry—so check back for that!)
      Mana considerations are hugely important as well. “Oftentimes, your opponent could have more than enough damage to win the game, but not enough mana to utilize all of those cards. Keep in mind whether you have to make the safest play—even if your opponent has held a few cards for a long time,” HotMEOWTH says. That’s especially great advice for facing off against aggressive decks.
      “If your opponent isn’t holding any specific cards, it’s still important to keep track of what’s left in their deck,” HotMEOWTH says. “What are the odds of them drawing a card that would allow them to win? Ask yourself whether you can afford to play safe and prevent it or not.” (We’ll also talk more about the strategy of playing to your outs later in Midgame Week.)
      Finally, your own Health is a crucial consideration. “When you’re facing opponents that are playing decks that can burst you down from a high Health total, it’s important to count the maximum damage they can do with their combos,” HotMEOWTH says. “For example, Druids can unleash large chunks of damage using Savage Roar with just a few minions on the board." If facing off against such a deck, he suggests playing minions with Taunt and making trades accordingly.
      Part Three: Reading Your Opponent [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)

      While you’ve been navigating the game—thinking every turn about whether you have lethal or if you can survive your opponent’s next turn—you also should be monitoring the state of your opponent’s hand and deck. Matthijs “Theo” Lieftink, a two-time representative of The Netherlands in the Hearthstone Global Games (HGG), has strong advice for anyone looking to improve their hand-reading skills, including how to bluff your opponent’s reads.
      “Hand-reading is an important part of pro-level play, and you can get an edge if you are doing it better than your opponent,” Theo says. His advice? “Keep track of how many cards your opponent keeps in the mulligan.” If they’re still holding one of those cards into the midgame, it’s probably a critical tech card or a high-value element of their strategy. Of course, “It depends on what your opponent is playing,” Theo adds.
      To learn hand-reading, he suggests thinking about what the absolute best play could have been every turn. If your opponent didn’t make the optimal play—for example, playing a Flamestrike on turn seven to clear your board of four-Health minions—that tells you that they probably didn’t have the tools to do so.
      Countering your opponent’s hand-reading is the next level of difficulty. “Bluffing that you do or don’t have a certain card can be done in several ways,” Theo says. He suggests making plays that suggest a specific follow-up for your next turn is in-hand, whether you’re holding it or not. “The same thing can be done the other way around—making worse plays to pretend you don’t have a certain card in hand.” He’s quick to point out, however, that this can be risky—your opponent might play around the card you’re hiding anyway. “It’s important to know when you can afford to bluff,” he says. “Making ‘worse’ plays to set something up can always backfire.”
      A special thanks to Theo for his continued provision of expert advice! Hand-reading is an enormously difficult skill to learn, and it’s one that even the best players continue to work at every day.
      Part Four: When the Plan Falls Apart [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)

      You had a grand plan. It was perfect. A flawless combination all but set up, waiting for that last crucial card—and then you realize that your opponent will win, unless you expend one of your key cards to stay in the game. Fear not! All is not necessarily lost, and Esteban “AKAWonder” Serrano of SK Gaming—a fixture of the European pro Hearthstone scene—will help you understand how to navigate what’s left when your deck’s win condition is scattered to the wind.
      Regardless of your deck style, AKAWonder says you must look for a new strategy if your original one has been derailed. “When you lose your win condition, you need to find an alternative plan to win the game," he says. "Most likely, your chances to win are lower than they were.” But so long as they aren't zero, you have a chance. He suggests looking for every point of win percentage you can, by any means possible.
      “In order to find an alternative plan, I think about different situations—denying my opponent their win condition, going to fatigue, or just creating pressure using minions,” AKAWonder says. He adds that certain cards can offer new outs all their own, like The Lich King.
      It’s not always easy, but practice helps. He says, “You need to find a new way to win—and the more you play a deck, the more alternative game plans you will discover for different matchups.” If you’re newer to Hearthstone, he says this is actually a valuable lesson to learn: “Your win condition is important, but not if you lose with it in your hand. Go for an alternative plan if the situation forces you to!”
      Sounds like AKAWonder recommends a whole string of keywords: you need to Discover new ways to play and Adapt to the situation! Every game is different, so playing with that in mind just makes sense.
      Part Five: Playing to Your Outs [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)

      There’s a surprisingly wide gulf between winning and not losing yet. A very kind Jace “DrJikininki” Garthright, best known for his 2017 Americas Winter Playoffs victory, lends us his guidance today to distinguish between the two, helping you to “play to your outs”—making sure you’re still working towards a game-winning play.
      “It’s important to ask yourself every turn—how can I win this game?” DrJikininki says. “Some games, you may have a very slim chance to win, but recognizing when you are in that situation and adapting is a very important skill.” He cautions against what may seem instinctual, which is to make the "safe" play each turn. “All players have a tendency to make plays that would be considered safer,” he says. “Plays as simple as trading into minions on the board to live for an extra turn.”
      But the concept of playing to live isn’t how you should play. “Use critical thinking about the potential reach in your opponent’s deck,” DrJikininki says. “Taking slim percentage chances is what you have to do sometimes!” His advice makes sense—evaluating how a given line of play sets you up to win later is incredibly important.
      Getting there takes time, so DrJikininki echoes what others have said: practice. “Next time you play a game and are in a losing position, ask yourself—what hands can you beat? What play with your hand leads to you winning the most often? This will help you out more than just playing a large number of games.” He notes that understanding the variables—your deck’s reach, your opponent’s deck’s reach, whether or not either deck can afford to play a value game, and more—all factor into those questions.
      That’s it! We hope you’ve enjoyed this series of educational snippets from pro players across the competitive Hearthstone landscape, and that Midgame Week inspires you to take your game to the next level.
      Which of this week’s skills do you think is most important? What advice would you offer other players looking to learn more about how to level up their play? Offer up your thoughts in the comments and stay tuned for even more pro player insight right here on playhearthstone.com/esports.