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L0rinda

hearthstone Know Your Hearthstone Players #2: ThijsNL, RDU, and Lifecoach

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The second of our guides to competitive Hearthstone players features the three playing members of G2.Kinguin.

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We are now covering tournaments in the news section, and are aware that many of you will be encountering competitive Hearthstone for the first time. For those interested in getting into the tournament scene, as we report the build up to the 2016 World Championship, we are writing a series of guides about the top players. In this installment we cover the three playing members of the Archon Team League winners, G2.Kinguin, who were formerly known as Nihilum.



ThijsNL


 

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Thijs "ThijsNL" Molendijk, as his tag suggests, is from the Netherlands. He was already a well known player and streamer going into 2015, but in 2015 he really broke out on the tournament scene. His most notable solo win of the year was the Europe Championship, which won him entry in to the World Championship. What was even more impressive though, was how he quietly accrued the winnings throughout the entire year. He picked up over $1,000 or more in no fewer than eight events and his prize money total for the year was in excess of $85,000.

At events, he is an unassuming character who is always happy to offer his opinion or advice to those around him. That is, of course, if you can catch him at a time when he's not actually playing in the tournament. As he seems to reach the late stages of most things at the moment, that's easier said than done. On stream, Thijs is also very chatty and informative.


RDU


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Dima "RDU" Radu from Romania is 9th on the all time prize money list, one space behind teammate Thijs. He first made a splash on the scene when he won the Viagame Hearthstone Championship at Dreamhack Summer in 2014. At the time there was some controversy over this result, as one of the people on his friends list thought it would be amusing to send the message "Hi Mom" to RDU during the finals. This controversy however simply served to fire up RDU to prove himself. In the 18 months since then he has not only built a reputation for being one of the very best players in the world, but has accumulated a lot of prize money in the process. He has won nearly $95,000 in prizes in the last two years, almost $70,000 of that in 2015.

His stream is very informative, and he possesses a dark sense of humour which entertains his many followers. He does not suffer fools gladly, but if you treat him with respect he'll treat you with respect in return.


Lifecoach


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Adrian "Lifecoach" Koy represents Germany, and it one of the most interesting players on the tournament scene. His logical reasoning is regarded by many people as the best in the world, and before taking up Hearthstone he had put this to good use as a professional poker player. He plays notoriously slowly and usually starts playing his turn when the rope appears on screen. This slow play has led to him often being referred to as "Ropecoach". He will take the available time even on turns where there is not much to think about, as he wants to consider future turns that may require more thought than the 70 seconds available.

His ponderous style has not done him any harm though and in 2015 alone he won $1,000 or more on seventeen different occasions. To put that into context, using the stats gathered by esportsearnings, there have only been 44 players accumulate $17,000 or more in prize money in their entire careers. In 2015, Lifecoach earned over $100,000, and appears at sixth place on the career prize winnings list.

His unique style leads to his stream being incredibly thought provoking, as he often pauses a replay of his own games after playing and will spend several minutes discussing the different options. This makes sure that both he, and his viewers, learn some of the deeper aspects of the deck he is playing at the time. At live events, when Lifecoach speaks, people gather to listen. He is not only very informative, but is a truly nice guy.


If you missed the first in our "Know your players" series. You can find that here.

If you would like to see your favourite players covered in the future, let us know who they are in the comments below.

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