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Video Interview with Hafu About Sexism in Esports

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Fusion.net have released a video interview with Hafu, one of Hearthstone's top streamers and Arena players, regarding the difficulties that female players encounter in the esports world.


Interviewer Kevin Roose asks Hafu about the world of female gaming and gives her a platform to talk about some of the things she has had to go through. Although the video only has enough time to scratch the surface of the issue, it is a reminder that a huge percentage of the gaming demographic feels so unwelcome in esports that they feel like quitting, or hiding in the shadows.
 


What is clear from the video is that Hafu is an incredibly strong person. The concern has to be that if people this strong feel like giving up at times, the impact on less strong willed people has to be huge.

On the Reddit thread about the video, Iksar weighs in:

Blizzard Icon Iksar

Bums me out a little for anyone to not feel included in our community, especially so for someone that has done so much to contribute.

We’re all big supporters. Glad to have you as content contributor and as a good friend! (source)


Hafu is currently the top scorer in the 100/10 Arena challenge.
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Gasp, someone said something mean to me on the Internet. Oh the horror. If you people think that the Internet should be a safe space with ponies and rainbows, you are severely deluded.WbE8S.jpg

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It's not just about the "mean" comments. People have become hostile towards female streamers in general because of stupid reasons like "oh they are just using the fact they are women with big breasts to get more views".

 

While there are certainly streamers who belong in this category(not going to name any, but you probably know them already) there are also many who are just honest streamers looking to grow due to their gaming/entertainment skills on twitch, and people end up discouraging them by acting like the virgin 16 year olds they are in real life on twitch chat.

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"Gasp, someone said something mean to me on the Internet. Oh the horror. If you people think that the Internet should be a safe space with ponies and rainbows, you are severely deluded."

 

It's this kind of sorry excuse for basic decency (not to mention argumentative logic) that underlies the problem Hafu (or anyone who asks for reasonable behavior in an anonymous environment) faces.

 

Why should she not expect to be treated by the same guidelines and laws that govern our behaviour offline, in school, at work and in just about every other social or professional venue?  Are you saying that you are comfortable with a streamer being verbally abused simply because of their gender?  That's an okay situation for you?

 

Additionally, did she ask for ponies or rainbows?  No, she did not.  Did she seem deluded?  Also, no.  Was your post moronic, immature, patronising and offensive?  I thought so.

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Gasp, someone said something mean to me on the Internet. Oh the horror. If you people think that the Internet should be a safe space with ponies and rainbows, you are severely deluded.

"There was actually a team name On the tournament round, called Gonna rape Hafu on regionals. I was 17 (!!) at the time, but I've got turned off from competing, because harassment sucks.. And there's nothing you could do about it though."

 
Do you honestly think, that this is a normal thing to do? Joking with the rape of a 17 years old girl is not just "getting mean comments and cry". People (usually men), who think that this is acceptable and fun, should seriously start thinking about their lives, before they turn into an actual raper.
 
Why can't just people act like actual people towards men and women equally? Especially in the e-sports section, where you watch the stream for the gameplay not for the streamers' body parts?
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Gasp, someone said something mean to me on the Internet. Oh the horror. If you people think that the Internet should be a safe space with ponies and rainbows, you are severely deluded.

This is a perfect example of how this stuff always goes. Someone makes an extremely measured criticism which, in the case of this video, characterizes the problem as being much milder than it actually is. Then someone like Dejo93 reacts completely disproportionately and dishonestly represents what was actually said as a demand for special treatment. The people with unrealistic expectations of how the internet ought to work are the ones who expect to be able to be utterly toxic with no pushback whatsoever. It's totally OK for dudes to make rape and death threats but saying "hey could you maybe not" is a bridge too far.

Edited by daisyrawks
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It's not just about the "mean" comments. People have become hostile towards female streamers in general because of stupid reasons like "oh they are just using the fact they are women with big breasts to get more views".

 

And the fault is actually of those streamers for setting up the bad example as much as it is of the morons who cast everyone into the same box.

 

Same goes for all the thin-skinned people that think they have to care about what a random, unknown and anonymous idiot thinks of them.

 

 

 

It's this kind of sorry excuse for basic decency (not to mention argumentative logic) that underlies the problem Hafu (or anyone who asks for reasonable behavior in an anonymous environment) faces.

 

Why should she not expect to be treated by the same guidelines and laws that govern our behaviour offline, in school, at work and in just about every other social or professional venue?

 

It is exactly as it happens. In Real Life you get jerks just like you get them on the internet. Expecting everyone to behave with "common decency" online is indeeed deluded.

 

This whole crusade about how people should be all honorable and righteous online is nearly ridiculous, considering it doesn't even happen in the real world.

 

Grow up and stop caring what some moron says online lmao.

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Grow up and stop caring what some moron says online lmao.

If not caring what people say online is a thing we should all aspire to, what exactly are you doing here?

Edited by daisyrawks

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It is exactly as it happens. In Real Life you get jerks just like you get them on the internet. Expecting everyone to behave with "common decency" online is indeeed deluded.

 

I beg to differ.  So, to take a few examples:

 

If some random stranger starts following you in the street and shouting abuse at you, they might be arrested for disturbing the peace.  If they were persistent, you could probably have a restraining order placed on them for harassment. 

 

How about most sporting events? Do you think it would be acceptable or without repercussion if one team in a sporting match at the Olympics decided to wear a strip that said they were going to rape the other team?  One assumes this would not go unnoticed, or be allowed to continue to a televised performance.  Gross indecency laws may come into play (regardless of what you scoff at as common decency).

 

What about the workplace?  We can argue that Hafu is at her place of work, earning her living.  In my place of work, if anyone spoke to me the way that people have spoken in derogatory terms to Hafu (whether they be customers or fellow members of staff), they would be punished for it.  Members of staff would be disciplined.  Customers would be asked to alter their tone and use of language or leave.

 

Why do you believe the Internet is a magical land in which the abuse of others should be considered to be okay, when it is not considered okay in any other location within our society?  I think it is you that is deluded.  It should not stand as okay.  You should not stand up for it.  Are you saying that you support the denigration of women?  Are you saying you are a proud misogynist? Are you saying that Hafu's gender makes her less worthy of respect than someone who just so happens to have been born with a penis?

 

I don't expect everyone to behave well: but I hope that they do, and I hope that we would wish them to.

Edited by mimech
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Ymoh does have a point, though. Sure, we have all these laws, ethical codes, codes of conduct etc. but let's not forget that we live in a highly hypocritical society. A lot of men disrespect women and a lot of women disrespect men on a daily basis. When society doesn't allow you to express these negative feelings for the opposite sex (for whatever reason), it's easy to let them free in a more morally loose environment like the Internet. I can present examples of this hypocrisy of the modern world for million other cases, not just gender issues.

 

Whether we like it or not, we weren't born equal. Perhaps, it was men that created the 'weak gender' stereotype, but women have learnt to revel in it and abuse it when it suits them. Both sexes, but especially women, need to grow some thick skin and more importantly, they need learn to fight their own battles.

 

PS: I am not a dude.

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Both sexes, but especially women, need to grow some thick skin

 

I'm sorry, but this just seems like a way in which you wish to blame the victim for the abuse they are suffering.  It is not the victim's fault that they suffer abuse: it is the fault of the person who chooses to abuse them.

 

Are you saying that Hafu should just accept being abused as part of the price of working on the Internet?  Also, you say that women, especially, should develop the ability to suffer abuse.  Why women, especially?  Why would this be the plan you wish to enact?  Or the reality you wish to accept?  Why would we not want to improve things.  If someone says "this hurts me", why is the reaction "deal with it" and not "let's try and change this"?

 

As for your summation that they (presumably you mean women) need to learn to fight their own battles: what does that actually mean?  Hafu is fighting her corner by taking part in the video piece.  So who is it that's not fighting?

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Ymoh does have a point, though. Sure, we have all these laws, ethical codes, codes of conduct etc. but let's not forget that we live in a highly hypocritical society. A lot of men disrespect women and a lot of women disrespect men on a daily basis.

What does this even mean? People generally are disrespectful to each other, therefore...what exactly?

When society doesn't allow you to express these negative feelings for the opposite sex (for whatever reason), it's easy to let them free in a more morally loose environment like the Internet.

Ah, well if it's easier, have at it then. Sure it's easier to bring yourself to do things otherwise considered unacceptable in a situation where you feel there will be no consequences. It doesn't follow from there that anyone needs to accept that state of affairs as normal or desirable.

I can present examples of this hypocrisy of the modern world for million other cases, not just gender issues.

You haven't presented any examples of anything. Just asserted that people are hypocrites because reasons.

 

Whether we like it or not, we weren't born equal.

I don't like it and I don't have to.

Perhaps, it was men that created the 'weak gender' stereotype,

I mean men are the ones who historically have had the power and influence to make decisions that keep women from being able to participate fully in society. That's demonstrably true.

but women have learnt to revel in it and abuse it when it suits them.

Uh what? Do tell. I can't wait to hear more about all the unfair advantages women have gained by reveling in their oppression.

Both sexes, but especially women, need to grow some thick skin and more importantly, they need learn to fight their own battles.

And why is that exactly? Why does everyone, particularly women, have to be content to be abused?

Seriously, do you have any more utterly fact free assertions you'd like to make?

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And let me just say one more thing about this whole "thick-skinned" business. Women like Hafu do what they do despite torrents of abuse up to and including rape and death threats. Any woman who attempts to exist in a space traditionally dominated by men experiences this. The idea that women are thin skinned when they have the courage to speak up and demand to be treated better is ludicrous. We actually live in a world where, in order to be considered strong, women have to be willing to quietly tolerate systematic abuse.

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Wow... reading through some of these comments like...  O_O

As someone who's competed in actual contact sports (martial arts oriented), the whole "Rape Hafu" thing is just fucking insane. I can't imagine that ever happening in real sports. I also can't imagine being a 17 year old girl facing off against a bunch of dudes with that as their fucking team name.

Rando comments from internet trolls are not the problem, it's that plus everything else combined.

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Both sexes, but especially women, need to grow some thick skin and more importantly, they need learn to fight their own battles.

 

PS: I am not a dude.

 

I don't disagree with you on one level, as someone who has taught women to defend themselves. But in a situation where you are seventeen, you show up to play a video game tournament, and the opposing team is named "Gonna Rape Hafu at Regionals" (or whatever the full name was) and not Blizz, not another team, NO ONE attempts to stop that right out of the gate? That's shameful.

 

Hafu's just a player. It's very hard to come back from being disillusioned, ESPECIALLY at age seventeen.

 

And good for you if the words of rando's and people who are in your face don't affect you at all. Not everyone is built the same.

 

As a final comment, good people building "thick skin" doesn't actually solve the problem. That's the same logic Trump is using to try and build a wall around Mexico, or Ted Cruz with his grand plans to nuke ISIS.

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      In this example nine of the last ten Druids we faced were Jades, which extrapolates to a 90% chance that the current Druid you are currently facing is also a Jade. If you assume that keeping the Skulking Geist drops your win percentage from 50% to 0% against all other Druids (which it doesn’t), you’re still only giving up 5% win percentage over the course of 10 games (50% or .5 divided by 10). This means that keeping the Skulking Geist would still be the smarter decision if getting to play the card increased your overall match win percentage against Jade Druid by more than 5.6% (50% or .5 divided by 9), which I’m almost certain that it does. Though it might seem greedy to keep an expensive or narrow card in your opening hand without being certain what you’re up against, the numbers show that it’s often correct to do so.
      Try to resist the urge to mulligan away an expensive card in your hand before considering the odds that it could tilt the matchup in your favor. Consider the prevalence of each deck in your opponent’s class, as well as the impact an individual card has on the overall win percentage in each matchup. It’s far too complex to calculate exact numbers, but with time and practice you can start to get a sense for when and why you should keep certain narrow or expensive cards in your opening hand.
      Conversely, there are cards which are typically strong in opening hands but must be mulliganed away based on your opponent’s class or the expected matchup. These cards might line up poorly against the enemy’s Hero Power or common class cards. For example, minions with one Health are typically miserable against Mage, and early Deathrattle cards like Kindly Grandmother with 2 power or less can get blown out by Potion of Madness. The ability to recognize when it is correct to mulligan away cards that are typically strong is just as important as the ability to recognize when it is correct keep cards that are typically weak.
      50% Theory
      It is often correct to hold onto a card which might not be ideal but is just above the cut. In what I call “50% Theory”, I always try to stop and ask myself if there is a greater than 50% chance that the card I’m thinking about mulliganing away will turn into a worse one. I often find that my first instinct is to mulligan away a less than perfect card to try and find something better, but that when I apply 50% theory I realize that my odds of improving my hand actually decrease by shipping the card away.
      Curving Out
      Another reason to keep potentially expensive cards is because your hand can naturally curve into them. For example, let’s say you’re playing a deck which typically always mulligans away 4 drops in the dark. If the other two cards in your hand are a 2 drop and a 3 drop, then it could potentially be worth keeping the 4 drop so long as it is a natural follow-up to the other two cards.
      Checking the curve of our hand can also help us catch when we might have too much of a good thing. Many cards which are typically excellent in opening hands might not pair well with the other cards in our hand, or even with a second copy of itself. N'Zoth's First Mate is typically the best card for Pirate Warrior on turn one, but the second copy should almost always be shipped away. The same can often (though not always) be said for Innervate, depending on what the final card or cards in your opener are. If you’re on Aggro Druid and your opening hand is double Innervate + Bittertide Hydra, then you have a potentially game winning play on turn one. If your hand is double Innervate + Living Mana, then you’ll want to ship both the Living Mana and one of the Innervates to try and find yourself a better curve.
      The Checklist
      To recap, here are a list of questions you should ask yourself about each hand while mulliganing:
      Based on my opponent’s class and the local metagame, which decks could my opponent be playing? Is this a line up theory matchup? Are there any narrow answers or threats in my hand? Do I have any cards which are very powerful against one of these decks? Am I increasing my overall win percentage by keeping these cards? Do I have any cards which are very weak against one of these decks? Am I decreasing my overall win percentage by keeping these cards? Does this hand curve out? Does it have a game plan? Do I have any expensive cards which I should mulligan away for something less expensive? If so, is there a greater than 50% chance that getting rid of one of these cards will yield a worse result? It’s important to note that the de facto “most important factor” of mulligans, the mana cost of the cards, is the second to last question when working down this checklist. This isn’t to say that the mana cost of the cards in your opening hand isn’t important, it's just that there are many other things you should be thinking about as well.
      Another thing of note is that I never stop to ask if I have cards in my hand which should be automatically kept. I believe that you can get yourself into trouble by thinking about cards as “automatic keeps”, and should instead start off by viewing each card through the lens of the specific matchups you’re anticipating. Granted, to this day I have still never mulliganed away the first copy of Flametongue Totem, but I’d like to think that’s because I have yet to encounter a matchup where it isn’t good in my opening hand and not because the card is an "automatic keep".
      Conclusion
      Line up theory can help us think about our boards, hands, and decks as distinct sets of limited tools. By lining up our tools against our opponent’s problems we can attempt to organize our game plan into the most effective and thorough plan possible. Some matchups are dictated entirely by line up theory, while in other matchups we can use the lessons we've learned from line up theory to gain small edges in efficiency.
      Mulligans are an often overlooked or misunderstood facet of the game, but they are sometimes the most important decision we make in the entire game. By taking the time to carefully consider all the reasons why we should or shouldn’t keep each card in our opener, we are adding one more edge to our game which will help propel us to the next stage of the ladder.
      For the fourth and final installment of Legend in the Making, I will discuss all of the subtle ways that game behavior can inform the exact content of player’s hands. By analyzing the ordering decisions and tiny mistakes our opponents make we can glean much more information about our their game plan than you might think. Please join me in part four as we make the final push towards our ultimate goal of reaching Legend.
      - Aleco
      Part 1 - Ranks 25 to 15 - Knowing your Role and Embracing Mistakes
      Part 2 - Ranks 15 to 10 - Having a Plan and Playing to Outs
      Part 4 - Ranks 5 to Legend - Tools for the Climb and the Art of the Read
    • By Aleco

      In episode two of "What's the Move?" Aleco discusses an open-ended situation which doesn't have a clear answer.
      In episode two of "What's the Move?" Aleco discusses an open-ended situation which doesn't have a clear answer.
      We kicked off this new series by analyzing a tricky situation which had only one optimal line of play. In episode two we'll take a look at a very different kind of situation, one where there might not be a perfect move at all.
      Please let us know in the comments what you would have done in this situation! One of the primary goals of this series is to foster improvement at Hearthstone by generating discussions. We would also love to hear your feedback on the video itself, as the series is still very new and has plenty room to improve on its format.
      - Aleco
    • By Stan

      In the latest Hearthstone update, Blizzard made adjustments to several cards. The patch is now live now on desktop and it should become available on mobile devices in the coming hours.
      Philosophy and reasons behind these changes can be found here.
      Blizzard (Source)
      Card Changes
      Innervate now reads: Gain 1 Mana Crystal this turn only. (Down from 2)
      Fiery War Axe now costs 3 mana.  (Up from 2)
      Hex now costs 4 mana. (Up from 3)
      Murloc Warleader now reads: Your other Murlocs have +2 Attack. (Down from +2 Attack, +1 Health)
      Spreading Plague now costs 6 mana. (Up from 5) 
    • By Zadina

      A new Brawl has landed in the Tavern.
      Just like with the previous expansions, it's time to try out the deck recipes of Knights of the Frozen Throne in this week's Tavern Brawl. The archetypes for each deck recipe are the following:
      Druid: I guess the best name for this deck is Midrange Druid. It has Ultimate Infestation and Spreading Plague, so... PROFIT?! Deathrattle Hunter Elemental Mage Divine Shield Paladin Control Priest (you've probably seen variations of it in ladder) Jade Deathrattle Rogue Freeze Shaman Zoolock Control Warrior with Enrage minions This is a good opportunity to try out cards that you don't own. Good luck and have fun!
    • By Zadina

      The balance patch is arriving in the beginning of the next week.
      The wait is over! The anticipated card balance changes will arrive on September 18th and hopefully freshen up the meta a little bit. As the case always is with balance patches, for the next two weeks if you disenchant Spreading Plague and/or Murloc Warleader, you will get their full value in Arcane Dust.
      Daxxarri
      In the recent Upcoming Balance Changes – Update 9.1 blog, we discussed the details and philosophy behind balance updates that are coming to several Hearthstone cards:
       
      Innervate - Now reads: Gain 1 Mana Crystal this turn only. (Down from 2) Fiery War Axe - Now costs 3 mana. (Up from 2) Hex - Now costs 4 mana. (Up from 3) Murloc Warleader - Now reads: Your other Murlocs have +2 Attack. (Down from +2 Attack, +1 Health) Spreading Plague - Now costs 6 mana. (Up from 5)
      This patch is currently targeted for September 18th PDT. Please note that updates for mobile devices may take a few additional hours to propagate.

      Once these card changes are live, players will be able to disenchant cards that are not Basic (Murloc Warleader and Spreading Plague) for their full Arcane Dust value for two weeks. Basic cards cannot be disenchanted and will not be available for an Arcane Dust refund. (source)