Vlad

[Archived] Arena Mage Spreadsheet

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This thread is for comments about our Arena Mage Spreadsheet.

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Why is Blizzard missing from the Spreadsheet?

It's a Rare card, so you need to look for it in the Rare cards tab.

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What about frostbolt?

Common tab, first row, second column.

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DId pretty well following these spreadsheets and went 8/3 using the following deck

 

1x Ice Lance
3x Mana Wyrm
1x Acidic Swamp Ooze
2x Faerie Dragon
1x Mad Bomber
1x Sorcerer's Apprentice
4x Vaporize
1x Big Game Hunter
1x Harvest Golem
1x Scarlet Crusader
1x Wolfrider
2x Fireball
1x Polymorph
1x Chillwind Yeti
1x Defender of Argus
1x Water Elemental
1x Faceless Manipulator
1x Stampeding Kodo
1x Venture Co. Mercenary
1x Boulderfist Ogre
1x Sunwalker
1x Flamestrike
1x Sea Giant
 
So many vaporize came in pretty useful in helping me take out tough minions. Also i had a lot of low cost minions so in most games i was able to put a lot of early game pressure on my opponents usually dealing about 10 damage by turn 4/5. I felt a slight lack of spell power, but the minions really held it down for me through most games with very few bad draws
 
any tips or advice?
Edited by Akaitsuki

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Ice Lance can be good in some scenarios, proportional to the amount of Freeze cards you have - Frost Nova, Cone of Cold, Frost Bolt, Blizzard, Water Elemental etc... This dependency generally makes it an extremely bad choice in the arena. Stay away from it if there is a remotely useful alternative available in the same selection.

Vaporize is a horrible card in my opinion. The effect is great, however as soon as you play against decent opponents, they will often anticipate Vaporize and play around it, which will often make it really bad. 

Picking 4 copies of the same card will always be bad if those 4 cards are not from the top tiers. 

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I am a relative noob at this game but have found the guides very helpful.

 

Had my best Arena round using this Mage guide 6/3.  I know, nothing to write home about but, my best so far.

 

130 gold and a deck.

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I am a relative noob at this game but have found the guides very helpful.

 

Had my best Arena round using this Mage guide 6/3.  I know, nothing to write home about but, my best so far.

 

130 gold and a deck.

 

Glad to hear that. Keep it up!

 

Got my first 0/3 following this spreadsheet ...thanks...

 

 

this spreadsheet=crap got my first 0/3 following this crap ty alot

 

I'm sorry you guys didn't do very well. There are many reasons why you would get a bad result from an Arena run. You may have had a bad draft, unlucky draws, opponents with good decks, etc.

 

But it is also quite likely that, while picking the cards that this spreadsheet recommends, you did not have a good understanding of how to put them to their proper use. This can always happen when you start using cards that you're not generally accustomed to. All you can do is try to get a good understanding of why each card is valued as highly as it is (the card descriptions we have for each card should go a long way towards that end), and to persevere.

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this spreadsheet=crap got my first 0/3 following this crap ty alot

I couldn't disagree more.  I had struggled before reading this with many 0-3, some 4-6, once I got 7 wins.  After I read this I have drafted several times and got my first 8 wins and 6 wins with a Paladin.  I just drafted a Mage and got 2 losses in the first 2 games, but I don't blame the deck or choices, my opponents had god-draws.  For myself,  I will rank the Questing Adventurer one tier worse because I have a tendency to hang on to it for a big one (and stifling board control in the process).

 

Here's my current draft:

 

1 Arcane Missiles

1 Elven Archer

1 Amani Berserker

2 Bloodfen Raptor

1 Dire Wolf Alpha

1 Knife Juggler

1 Acolyte of Pain

1 Emperor Cobra

1 Flesheating Ghoul

1 Questing Adventurer

1 Raging Worgen

1 Shattered Sun Cleric

1 Cone of Cold

1 Fireball

3 Polymorph (drew none of these against a Priest with multiple utility minions)

1 Dark Iron Dwarf

1 Gnomish Inventor

1 Violet Teacher

3 Silver Hand Knight

1 Blizzard

1 Boulderfist Ogre

3 Flamestrike

1 Pyroblast

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I couldn't disagree more.  I had struggled before reading this with many 0-3, some 4-6, once I got 7 wins.  After I read this I have drafted several times and got my first 8 wins and 6 wins with a Paladin.  I just drafted a Mage and got 2 losses in the first 2 games, but I don't blame the deck or choices, my opponents had god-draws.  For myself,  I will rank the Questing Adventurer one tier worse because I have a tendency to hang on to it for a big one (and stifling board control in the process).

 

Here's my current draft:

 

1 Arcane Missiles

1 Elven Archer

1 Amani Berserker

2 Bloodfen Raptor

1 Dire Wolf Alpha

1 Knife Juggler

1 Acolyte of Pain

1 Emperor Cobra

1 Flesheating Ghoul

1 Questing Adventurer

1 Raging Worgen

1 Shattered Sun Cleric

1 Cone of Cold

1 Fireball

3 Polymorph (drew none of these against a Priest with multiple utility minions)

1 Dark Iron Dwarf

1 Gnomish Inventor

1 Violet Teacher

3 Silver Hand Knight

1 Blizzard

1 Boulderfist Ogre

3 Flamestrike

1 Pyroblast

 

Thank you for your very level-headed post. It is quite refreshing. I hope you are successful in the future, and if you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask!

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Prior to reading this information, my best arena outing with a mage was 3/3. After reading, I went 5/3. However, I feel this guide fails to do four things. I'd recommend adding these points somewhere to improve the guide.

 

1. Discussing how to the different cards interact with each other such as minions, secrets, and spells.

 

2. Discussing what a players ratio or spells to minion should be.

 

3. Discussing how many cards you should have of each mana requirement. For instance, how many 1 mana cards in should I have in my 30 card deck versus how many 2 mana cards should I have in my deck? Maybe you could group the cards together in the discussion such 0-2, 3-5, 6+.

 

4. Discuss what class specific cards or combos to be cautious of when facing specific classes or what the mages weaknesses and strengths are versus specific classes.

 

Thanks for the help, Vlad

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Prior to reading this information, my best arena outing with a mage was 3/3. After reading, I went 5/3. However, I feel this guide fails to do four things. I'd recommend adding these points somewhere to improve the guide.

 

1. Discussing how to the different cards interact with each other such as minions, secrets, and spells.

 

2. Discussing what a players ratio or spells to minion should be.

 

3. Discussing how many cards you should have of each mana requirement. For instance, how many 1 mana cards in should I have in my 30 card deck versus how many 2 mana cards should I have in my deck? Maybe you could group the cards together in the discussion such 0-2, 3-5, 6+.

 

4. Discuss what class specific cards or combos to be cautious of when facing specific classes or what the mages weaknesses and strengths are versus specific classes.

 

Thanks for the help, Vlad

Hey!

 

I appreciate your suggestions very much, and I agree with most of them, but I don't think we'll be able to implement them. Another way to look at it is to say that they are already implemented. Let me explain.

 

Most of the information you point out would be required does already exist on our website, in various locations in our Hearthstone section.

 

For example, Secret guides will give you a pretty good understanding of how Secrets work. The card descriptions should give you plenty of information about cards, their interactions, and their synergies.

 

The mana curve and the strengths, weaknesses, and combos of classes are all discussed in our Arena Guide.

 

And lastly, a "spell to minion ratio" wouldn't really work. The reason for this is that there really isn't a hard and fast rule for this, or even the broadest of guidelines. I'd advise all new players to pick cards exclusively based on their value (according to the spreadsheet), and not try to balance spells and minions. I'd always favour minions over spells, all things being equal (you can do very well with 30 minions, but not with 30 spells), but if you follow the spreadsheet it will always work out. Of all the times I've built Arena decks, I haven't once thought "well, this minion is really strong but I need more spells, better pick up this average spell instead". As you become much more accustomed to the game, you'll form preferences and then you can try to go for more specific strategies (a spell-heavy deck, for example).

 

When I say we cannot implement the suggestions, I mean we cannot put all of these things together in the spreadsheet pages, or in a single guide. There is just too much information, and to put it all in one guide would create a monstrosity. Sure, it might be helpful for a bunch of people who can are willing and able to sift through the guide, but it'll overwhelm the majority of readers.

 

I hope you understand where we're coming from, and don't take this to mean that we aren't interested in suggestions. We really do appreciate them, and will accommodate them wherever possible. Thank you for your feedback!

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I know it says you have moved certain cards in the explanation below but when looking at the list it does not match.  Can you please fix.  Thanks in advance.

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Why are several of the changes in Changelog not reflected in the spreadsheet?

i.e. Shieldmaster

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Why are several of the changes in Changelog not reflected in the spreadsheet?

i.e. Shieldmaster

This is a changelog entry from January. The change has been reverted in a later update, for which we wrote a very succinct changelog entry. I made a tool the other day to automatically generate changelog entries that include all of the changes that occurred in the changes. The changelog entry from the 24th of July was generated with this tool. All changelog entries will now use this tool smile.png

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I highly disagree with the ranking of yeti. Yeti is the best neutral 4 drop there is! The fact alone that priests can't handle the yeti is a major factor. Only cards that are waiting for a big drop can handle with the yeti if you want to 1 for 1 (like hex, polymorph, fireball, naturalize, etc.). Yeti can take down other 4 drops, like Dark Iron Dwarf, Gnomish Inventor, Ancient Brewmaster, Stormpike Commander, etc. Yeti can take down bigger drops like Silver Hand Knight, Booty Bay Bodyguard, Azure Drake, etc and survive a few of them, where on the other hand "tazdingo" can't.

Actually the only lower drop that can handle the yeti (and the senjin) is an enraged armani beserker, most of the classes need an extra card to activate that. The mage can activate it, spending 2 extra mana on it, making it technically a 4 drop.

Yeti should be ranked up at least as a great card. Tazdingo should be ranked down.

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[...] (the card descriptions we have for each card should go a long way towards that end) [...]

Hi Vlad,

      Quick question. You mention these 'card descriptions' a couple of times. Where are these located? For example, clicking on Frostbolt in the spreadsheet just sends me here which doesn't contain any information that you can't get just hovering over the card. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious, but I'd appreciate a pointer to the fuller card descriptions.

Thanks!

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Hi Vlad,

      Quick question. You mention these 'card descriptions' a couple of times. Where are these located? For example, clicking on Frostbolt in the spreadsheet just sends me here which doesn't contain any information that you can't get just hovering over the card. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious, but I'd appreciate a pointer to the fuller card descriptions.

Thanks!

Hey! You were not missing anything obvious tongue.png I had messed something up and the card descriptions were not linked from the arena spreadsheets. This should be fixed now and clicking a card will get you to the corresponding description, rather than to Hearthpwn.

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Hi,

Wailing Soul (rare) is missing

Great job btw!

We are still at GamesCom, so we haven't updated the spreadsheets for the last wing of Naxx.

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When playing arena, do your opponents get progressively harder, as if you where in a knock-out tournament?  Or, do you still pick up random players possibly playing their first or even 11th arena match?  it seems to me that as I progress, I am facing enemies with much better decks, multiple legendarys!

 

Oh and is there a limit?  Somehow it seems to me it could be 12.  Why is that?

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