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Potential BlizzCon 2019 Leaks: WoW: Shadowlands, Diablo 4, Overwatch 2

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1 hour ago, Kuarinofu said:

Damn, this sucks. I always enjoyed Q&A session interactions and the memes they produce (like the WoW Red Shirt Guy).

I would guess that they're afraid of people making statements in regards China and Hong Kong.

So they just bottled it and have reverted to pre-screening written questions they can pick and choose from themselves instead.

 

Edited by OxO

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On 10/27/2019 at 7:49 PM, xendrius said:

Yea the features for the next expansion are really good.

 

Wait, we don't even know anything about the expansion, so why excited about it? Remember how excited we were for BFA? What makes you think the new one will feel any different? It will most likely be a new coat of paint, no game systems will change.

Yeah... and I can't be excited about the next one even if I don't know anything about it? Okay.. sir. -.-""""""""""""""""""""""""

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On 10/28/2019 at 12:20 PM, Migol said:

Ehh, Vanilla, TBC and WotLK were all good to great.    Cata was awful, I know most people say WoD was worst but Cata has my vote.    MoP was Ok.    Not good, not bad, just Ok.     WoD was pretty bad, Legion was pretty good.   BFA has been pretty bad, waiting to see 8.3 but it's looking grim.

To go a bit more in depth though, each expansion has had it's ups and downs.    TBC's launch had _all kinds_ of issues.   Constant server problems, completely imbalanced itemization (Naxx 40 gear and quest greens were better than kara epics); great story and all kinds of content though.     WotLK had Ulduar, the best raid they've ever released.   However it was followed by Trial of the Crusader, by far the worst raid they've ever released.     Mists was stupid obvious in pandaring for marketing reasons, they didn't do bad though in design for the most part...some very uninspired raids though and having to sit through Garrosh Derping it all up.    WoD, for all it's flaws, had a decent setup on launch and Blackrock foundry was a surprisingly good raid.   Legion was good except for the %[email protected]*%ing broken shore map design, stop throwing random bad pathing at us and calling it art!. 

And most of this could be forgiven if they hadn't eliminated the MMO aspect of the game and turned it into a "solo game unless you want to do new content before it shows up in LFR". No one talks in zone chats, dungeon queues, your reputation doesn't matter because you likely won't play with the same person twice so asshattery abounds, etc. And I love my druid, its been a 15 year love/hate ride, but I'm tired of seeing them everywhere because now gear auto-swaps stats on the majority of pieces, so you can literally be all 4 archetypes with one class.

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