Jump to content
FORUMS
Sign in to follow this  
Blainie

Christmas Contest Lore Recap

Recommended Posts

15070-christmas-contest-lore-recap.jpg

Wondering about the lore behind some of our clues? Check out our full discussion of the stories behind everything we chose and the clues that came with them.

 

We're going to be breaking down the different pieces of lore based on the days. Some of them are going to be much longer, while others are going to be simple, small pieces of the story. Let's get going!

 

Day 1 - Voidtalon of the Dark Star 

 

Our first day only ended up having one clue, but it still indicated the majority of the story behind this mount. 

 

SYkDI4L.png?1

 

There was a time when Draenor was filled with untainted beasts such as this, but the Shadowmoon Clan sought to bend them to their dark ways. When they realised that the beasts couldn't be forced to obey, they set out to destroy them all. The final egg was tainted by the touch of the Dark Star.

 

The Dark Star was in fact a Naaru named K'ara, who was injured in the crash of the Genedar. He entered into the "void" life cycle of the Naaru and was found by the orcs of Shadowmoon Valley. They named him the Dark Star, but when they discovered the evil powers of the void, one of the ancient leaders of the clan refused any further interaction with the evil being.

 

When threatened by Grom Hellscream, Ner'zhul broke the ancient laws put into place by his ancestors and began to draw upon the powers of the Dark Star. He and his people began to animate the dead in order to fight against the Draenei. 

 

Prophet Velen eventually sacrificed himself in order to cleanse the Naaru of its corruption and recreated K'ara.

 

This final egg of the beasts was lost in the void, only to be stumbled upon once again by the mighty adventurers that wish to sit and wait for hours upon hours. Neat!

 

Day 2 - The Shattered Halls 

 

This was one of our harder days to begin with, since you really needed some pretty intense knowledge of the dungeons to realise what it was early on. Let's break this one down, clue by clue.

 

Our first clue was a very subtle reference to a number of things. The face meaning simply implied that the dungeon was housed in a building that was found in both green and red. This relates to the two different Hellfire Citadels, one in Outland and one in Draenor.

 

The first part of the clue references something far darker. It talks about one of the darkest periods in Draenei history, in which they saw the majority of their race completely eradicated from the face of Draenor. When the orcs were first corrupted by the demon blood of Mannoroth, their lust for blood was insatiable. They were turned on the Draenei, who simply could not muster the necessary defenses to withstand the might of the Horde.

 

The orcs at the time weren't happy with simply winning a war. They sought pure genocide, to completely eradicate any living race in their path. They lived for battle, they lived to spill the blood of any they could find. The Draenei were no match for the new orcs and they were slaughtered, men, women and children alike. Their bodies were scattered across the Hellfire Peninsula, their bones used to construct one of the most horrendous sights in the game.

 

The Path of Glory is literally made of the bones of the slaughtered Draenei, leading through half of the region, from the Dark Portal to Hellfire Citadel. Despite a number of examples of the destruction wrought upon the Draenei, this path is the strongest example of just how many Draenei were slaughtered during that period.

 

iv6ffTu.png?1

 

A close-up of the bones on the Path of Glory.

 

Our second clue is pretty basic, it was essentially looking at the fact that the Hellfire Citadel, the building that houses Shattered Halls, is located in both timelines: once on Outland and once on Draenor. The second part of the clue does get slightly more complex however; we tried to help differentiate between the two timelines by referencing the "4th wing" of Hellfire Citadel, the raid Magtheridon's Lair. 

 

This raid used to be one of the prequisites for entering the Tempest Keep raid; you were sent on a quest to kill Magtheridon and retrieve his head. There was a slight double meaning here, in that you would also find Kargath Bladefist within the dungeon. He is the "head" of the Shattered Hand clan, as well as the Warchief of what he believes is the "True Horde".

 

Prior to the destruction of Draenor, the Citadel was used as a fortress for the great Warchief of the Horde, Blackhand. As the demonic corruption began to spread through the orcs, they started to abandon the elements that the Shamans communicated with, instead using the fel energy of the demons, commanded by the warlocks. The area around the Citadel began to decay, eventually being named Hellfire Peninsula. This led to the Citadel being given its name, Hellfire Citadel.

 

For a period, the Citadel was used as a training ground for the Horde, allowing them to house their military might, ensuring they were prepared for battle at any moment. They used the Citadel as a base during their final assault against the Draenei, as well as a base for their march on the Dark Portal. 

 

The Alliance Expedition that journeyed through the portal met the orcs at the Stair of Destiny, just in front of the portal, and battled their way to Ner'zhul. Ner'zhul had lost his mind, due to the artifact that he had recovered, the Skull of Gul'dan. It was speaking to him, controlling him, and Ner'zhul began to only care about his own wellbeing. He began to open portals around Draenor, attempting to find any means by which he could escape the ensuing battle, and further his power and safety.

 

lw40AC0.jpg?1

 

The skull of Gul'dan, held by Illidan Stormrage.

 

When the Alliance arrived at the Citadel, he was already long gone and had began opening more portals across Draenor. The instability caused by his portals eventually caused Draenor to implode, destroying the world as they had previously known it. Ner'zhul's lust for power had driven him to destroy their homeland.

 

The Citadel remained on Draenor, uninhabited and desloate, until Kargath Bladefist returned. Under the influence of the fel energy from blood of Magtheridon, they drained the Pit Lord slowly, using his blood to create more fel orcs to eventually create the Fel Horde.

 

Kargath now uses the Shattered Halls as his basis for ruling over the Fel Horde, ensuring that they continue to create more fel orcs.

 

The third clue was a reference to the fact that, inside the instance, you have one of two choices. You can either find a way to go through the door to the first boss or you can venture through the sewers. We were trying to see if people that had perhaps done the instance while it was current content remembered that part of it. It was a huge help having either an engineer or a rogue to break/pick the lock on the door. 

 

The fourth one was just us trying to single out the Shattered Halls as the only dungeon in the area that was behind a gate.

 

Day 3 - Bastion of Twilight 

 

This was one of the faster days, but we managed to get to the second clue. Our first clue was a direct reference to the first fight, against Halfus Wyrmbreaker.

 

When you entered the raid on normal, there were five dragons chained up behind Halfus. Two of the dragons would be immobilised each week, meaning that you could only deal with three of them each time you tried the encounter on normal.

 

The second clue was a bit more interesting in regards to lore. The mother that we are referring to is Sinestra, also known as Sintharia. She was the consort of Deathwing himself, the only dragon to actually survive mating with him after his transformation. She was the mother of two very well known dragons within the universe: Nefarian and his sister, Onyxia.

 

pua7Lgd.jpg
 

The main hint that distinguished the siblings in the clue was the idea that Sinestra had lost them "twice". Nefarian perishes twice, in Blackwing Lair and Blackwing Descent, while Onyxia perishes in Onyxia's Lair twice, but also in Blackwing Descent as her "re-animated" form.

 

Day 4: Damien's Ice-Vein Mask 

 

This one didn't have many lore-based clues, so if you want to read the story behind the clues, just check out the Day 4 post. Instead, I'm going to take a look at the story behind the NPC that drops the piece of loot.

 

z51PfOC.jpg?1

 

Ordos was one of the Yaungol, a sort of yak-humanoid race. He was a Shaman once, but was promised eternal life and power by the Fire Lords. He sacrificed his mortal self to the flame, in order to become a demigod. Demigods in the Warcraft universe are immortal in time, but can still be killed, as evidenced by those felled in the War of the Ancients.

 

Ordos was never told of the agony that he would suffer at the hands of the flames that engulf him; those that worship him will make prayers in order to ease the pain that he suffers.

 

Day 5: Gunther Arcanus 

 

This seemed to be the most puzzling day, reaching four clues, but still only getting three correct answers. Let's take a look at the story behind this, quite frankly, amazing NPC. 

 

Gunther Arcanus was initially a member of the Kirin Tor until the Third War. He perished at the hands of the Scourge and was raised as one of the undead. Gunther was an exceptionally powerful mage in his life, with exceptional abilities that were only amplified by his revival. 

 

He is one of the few in history that broke the control of the Lich King over him alone. He had no help from others, but simply used his own magic to break the link. He wandered until he found himself in Tirisfal Glades, at a place now known as Gunther's Retreat. He was surrounded by the mindless dead on the island and believed that every other undead being was just as mindless as the zombies around him.

 

He distrusted any that came to him, but an adventurer was eventually sent in the name of Sylvanas, to speak with Gunther. Gunther was discovered by the Forsaken through a book, which named the mage as a Lich. We are still unsure of whether this is actually true, since his immense powers might have just made people think he was one.

 

5tQdCZm.jpg?1

 

Gunther never allied himself with anyone before being approached by the Forsaken, so this is the reasoning behind our first clue. He trusted only himself.

 

Our second and third clues are explaned above, but it's worth noting that the "book on the floor" is found in Dalaran, in the Violet Citadel.

 

The last clue refers to the actual location of Gunther. His island is in the middle of the Brightwater Lake, so it's "across the bright waters" and is in direct view of the city of the Banshee Queen, Sylvanas.

 

Hopefully you've enjoyed our lore-recap of the competition and you learnt a few new facts in the meantime!

 

Thanks again to everyone that participated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Stan
      We've recently launched Icy Wiki, which we aim to transform into a network of high-quality gaming-related wikis for multiple game titles.
      Aside from our sister site PoE Vault, we've recently launched a new website called Icy Wiki that focuses on high-quality Wiki-style content that we are planning to transform into a hub that will feature multiple game titles.
      Currently, Icy Wiki includes a Diablo Immortal Wiki with everything we know about the upcoming game, and Valorant Wiki that we're almost done polishing and that will have a lot more content added to it in the near future.
      We plan on expanding the list of games, and we would love to hear your feedback! Let us know which games you would like to see on Icy Wiki in the future.
      You can also contribute by signing up for an account to edit the existing pages or create new ones.
    • By Blainie
      As you many of you likely already know, the latest Path of Exile league went live yesterday, alongside the release of Diablo 3's Season 20. We've put together a list of the best starters from our sister site, PoE Vault!
      As many of you probably already know, Icy Veins has a sister site, PoE Vault, that specifically caters to Path of Exile. The release of the latest league for PoE coincided perfectly with the new Diablo season and, given our post outlining the updates to our guides for Diablo, we felt it was only fair to put together a list of the best starters for the Path of Exile fans among you.
      Witch

      Elementalist
      The Storm Brand Elementalist has solid clear speed, strong output on most bosses, has awesome defences, and is quite mobile; however, it must rely on traps for additional single-target damage. The Triple Herald Elementalist has great clear speed, formidable defenses, powerful life leech, is immune to physical reflect, and has good single-target damage output. Unfortunately, some map mods are not efficient, and you’ll have to keep an eye out for mechanics, due to this being a melee build. Occultist
      The Herald of Agony/Rain of Arrows Occultist has absurd defenses, is viable in all Leagues, can do all map mods without any effort, and has a ranged playstyle. Unfortunately, proximity shields are difficult to deal with and can put you in awkward situations. You’ll also be relying on AI for your minion and the playstyle might feel a tad clunky due to this. The Herald of Agony/Ball Lightning specializes heavily in applying strong curses via curse-on-hit setups, has great sustain, and easily obtains a huge energy shield pool. As before, you’ll be relying on AI for your minion, which isn’t always all that smart, and the playstyle might feel a tad clunky. Cold skills got greatly buffed during 3.5, and the Occultist Ascendancy has great synergy with all of them. The Vortex/Cold Snap Occultist is quite versatile, but bear in mind it can be quite pricey, and damage-over-time setups are not for everyone. The Essence Drain & Contagion Occultist build offers great balance between clear speed, single-target damage, and defense, but you’ll have to get used to using two skills instead of one. Necromancer
      The Raise Spectre Necromancer build offers a very easy playstyle, but is not a good idea for SSF and the minion AI can be somewhat silly. Ranger

      Deadeye
      The Tornado Shot Deadeye is one of the best builds when it comes to clear speed, but keep in mind that it is poorly suited for high-tier mapping and boss killing. While typically focused on Magic Find, our build includes options for more general usability as well, as would be the case during the Flashback event. Pathfinder
      The Kinetic Blast/Barrage Pathfinder is also an insanely fast clearer, has extremely strong defenses (95%+ chance to avoid attacks without flasks active), is very nimble on its feet, and most importantly, is very, very, very fun to play. While better than the Tornado Shot Deadeye at single-target and boss fights, the build still struggles without proper gear (such as Queen of the Forest) and links, and can sometimes feel too fast. Raider
      The Spectral Throw Raider is very high-tempo and engaging (which is both a blessing and curse). You also get great mobility, awesome clear speed and the confidence which comes with feeling powerful in virtually any environment. Do note that this is the only build in this list which we do not recommend for Hardcore play. Scion - Ascendant

      The Ancestral Warchief Ascendant has very good single-target potential, it feels, and is, quite safe to play, and you won’t ever have to worry about damage reflect. The clear speed isn’t that great however, and totem builds don’t appeal to everyone. Duelist

      Slayer
      The Cyclone Slayer is a well balanced build, is very fun to play, combining the allure of high single-target with decent clear speed and sustain for a good ol’ beefy melee brute. The downside of this build is that it’s necessary to deal damage in order to survive, due to having practically no health regeneration. The leveling experience is smooth, however, and you’ll have no issue in dealing with most types of content. Gladiator
      The Double Strike Gladiator can definitely be used in hardcore, but keep in mind that your main focus will be on gaining a larger health pool in order to prevent one-shots. Champion
      Champion is the king of Imaples, a very powerful mechanic that allows you to stack tons of extra Physical damage on enemies. The Imaple Cyclone Champion makes a great use of this mechanic at the cost of little to no investment. Marauder

      Chieftain
      The Holy Flame Totem Chieftain is perfect for an SSF environment due to its lax equipment requirements. The build feels quite safe to play, has a great life pool and decent life sustain mechanics. The build’s clear speed isn’t all that good, but you’ll find that bosses are no problem at all. Juggernaught
      The Molten Strike Juggernaut can become stunningly powerful if properly equipped. This build can get quite pricey, but with the right luck, you can achieve more than 90% physical and 80% elemental damage mitigation. Specifically created for running Labyrinths fast and efficient without a shred of danger for your life, the Uber Labyrinth Farmer Juggernaut is an extremely tanky build. Albeit not that good at handling late-game content, we do believe it’ll help you rise to the tops of the Flashback Juggernaut ranks. Shadow

      Saboteur
      The Arc Mines Saboteur is a jack of all trades. The build has remained a powerhouse despite recent nerfs and is arguably the most dominant of all  Arc variants, and is a great choice for both Standard and SSF leagues. The Arc Mines Saboteur offers a wide variety of modifications, is a very fast clearer and can deal some heavy amounts of damage with very little investment; movement speed is also pretty crazy on this one. Trickster
      The Caustic Arrow Trickster does not require a specific set of uniques and a simple Silverbough will do you well until you manage to get your hands on some more currency.  Kaom's Heart and Devoto's Devotion will give you a very nice boost in survivability and clear speed. Damage-over-time builds are an acquired taste though, so choose wisely. The Divine Ire Trickster makes good use of the brand new Divine Ire gem. Overall, this is a well balanced build which is great at killing monsters off-screen. You will have to stay still in order to channel your skill and deal damage, however, which can put you in some tight situations. The Kitava’s Thirst Flame Surge Trickster is very high-tempo and does a great job at making your enemies explode into hundreds of pretty lights. The  Flame Surge skill is carefully woven around  Kitava's Thirst in order to create very strong single-target damage with potent energy shield restoration mechanics. The randomness of effects might affect your gameplay a tad though, and all the lights could be off-putting to some. The Soulrend Trickster is a good Chaos-based option for pretty much any league (SSF, Hardcore and Softcore). What’s essential about this build is that it is created with survival and comfort in mind, all while maintaining a very high rate of experience per hour. You can reach Level 100 safely and on a very tight budget, which is perfect for the Flashback event. Storm Burst is another great channeling skill which earned more love during 3.6. The Storm Burst Trickster offers nice single-target damage and great range, but doesn’t do that well in elemental reflect areas and the best equipment can become quite pricey. Another build that is expected to be extremely powerful is Furty’s ED/Contagion Trickster, which allowed him to be the 5th player hitting level 100 in a SSFSC environment. The build is very versatile, easy to gear and strikes a great balance between offense and defense. Templar

      Hierophant
      Another decent totem build would be the Frostbolt/Glacial Cascade Totems Hierophant.  Being totem-based, this build feels nice and safe to play, and you’ll have quite a bit of mobility. Depending on the type of content, though, you might need to swap gems here and there. Inquisitor
      The Purifying Flame Inquisitor has lots of life regeneration, decent defences, very high damage at a low cost, and is incredibly easy to play, albeit a little slow at clearing. Guardian
      Herald of Purity & Dominating Blow Guardian is able to achieve a great amount of endgame damage potential while you are mainly focusing on survivability while gearing up. If you've never played Path of Exile before, this might be the perfect time for you to jump in and give it a go! If you're more of a Diablo fan, you can check out our full set of updated guides for Season 20.
    • By Blainie
      We are recruiting for a number of new positions on the site!
      Icy Veins is looking to expand its current team with the introduction of writers for new sections, for games such as League of Legends, Dota 2, and Teamfight Tactics, as well as a freelance Graphic Designer.
      As some of you may have already noticed, we have updated our Jobs page with new positions, with multiple openings for new guide writers to help us in expand into new ventures. The requirements and responsibilities of all of these positions are listed there, as well as notes on the general application process for Icy Veins.
      Graphic Designer Position
      While these positions follow a very similar structure to those of our past posts, this is one of the first times we have reached out to our community in the hopes of finding a freelancer that can help develop the visual standard of the site.
      Rather than simply looking elsewhere, we felt it was best to look within our own community first, to hopefully find someone who not only understands the aesthetic and visuals of the games we cover, but also the look and feel of the Icy Veins site.
      You can find the requirements for the position below and, if you are interested or feel that you have the necessary experience, you can send us an application at jobs@icy-veins.com.
      Given that we are appealing specifically to freelancers, the position will be paid as a traditional freelance contract, rather than our normal, revenue-sharing agreements for guide writers.
      Requirements
      You should have experience in both UI and UX design, with a portfolio demonstrating your abilities and previous projects. You should be a fan of Blizzard games, as well as the site, and have a strong understanding of the visual direction of both. We expect you to bring your own suggestions in terms of how to improve the visual aspect of the site, rather than simply awaiting direction. We hope to hear from some of you in the future and wish any and all potential applicants the best of luck!
    • By Blainie
      As many of you already know, Icy Veins has a sister site for Path of Exile, PoE Vault. The new league starts today and we thought it was a great opportunity to highlight some of the content our hardworking writers have put together for your enjoyment. If you haven't tried Path of Exile before, this might be the perfect chance for you to do so!
      The new Path of Exile League brings with it an enhanced focus on endgame bosses. You can expect tanky and dangerous single targets from both the Metamorph league and the Conquerors of the Atlas expansion, so a good all-around build is important to have, if you want to get off to a good start. We have tons of great guides, including a selection here specifically designed as great league starters, with a few for each class.
      For those just getting started in Path of Exile, take a look at our general Beginner's Guide, while anybody can benefit from the new Metamorph league guide, which will be kept updated as we continue the league. And as always, as the new best builds of the league become apparent, we will be keeping our guides up to date, so be sure to follow PoE Vault on social media to keep up with our latest content, as well as all the Path of Exile news as it comes.
      Duelists
      The "Ultimate Cyclone Slayer" is a great all-rounder, and with the bow meta likely upon us, much of its best gear will be at its cheapest. The 3.8 nerfs were vastly overstated, and this build has remained an absolute powerhouse, both in terms of speed and raw damage output. If you are looking to relive the glory days of your D2 Whirlwind Barbarian, this is the best way in the game to do it!
      If you are looking to ride the bow hype-train this league, the "Tornado Shot Champion" is a great way to do it, with no sacrifices made for survivability. It boasts huge damage, great clearspeed, and plenty of durability for the expected brutal boss fights in the Metamorph League. Its versatile gearing makes it highly customizable, able to suit every playstyle, from Labyrinth farmer to speed mapper, and anything in between.
      The "Bleed Earthquake Gladiator" lets you smash your enemies into bloody chunks, with great speed and high damage. Vaal Earthquake allows you to blitz through maps, while the Gladiator's bleed explosions clear up any stragglers that manage to survive your initial attacks. Gladiators have always made great league starters, and this league is no exception.
      Shadows
      The "Arc Trap Saboteur" just got a hefty buff, with a boost to its targeting range, bringing this build back into the meta. The last time it was around, it absolutely dominated all content, and it has not lost a bit of damage, so it will make an excellent choice in the coming league. The build made its name taking down hard bosses on a shoestring budget, so if you are looking to experience all the league has to offer, this is among the best builds to do it with.
      When it comes to league starters, few are better than the "Essence Drain + Contagion Trickster". It is one of the fastest clearing casters in the game, has great survivability, and offers a perfect blend of reliability and inexpensiveness. It has carried many players to high finishes in a variety of Solo-self-found races, but can still be taken advantage of with the higher powered gear offered by trade leagues.
      Marauders
      Taking advantage of one of the biggest buffs this league, the "Burning Arrow Chieftain" delivers fiery death from afar, making it a great choice for the bow lovers out there. Many reworked or long forgotten mechanics have come together to make this both a great league starter, and an amazing end-game scaling build in the new expansion. 
      The "Molten Strike Juggernaut" has long been a fan favorite, and with an extra projectile added this league, it looks to be a great option for anyone looking to maximize their sheer tankiness. It is a great build to take on just about all content in the game, whether it is deep delving, endgame bossing, or tanking slams from just about anything you want. 
      Witch
      While many minion builds took a hit this league, the "Summon Raging Spirit Necromancer" remains a powerful all-round build, equally at home taking down Uber Elder and speed farming maps. Gear will be much cheaper than in previous leagues, as people migrate to bows and other new builds, but this build is still a perfect starter for anybody looking to play a summoner.
      The "Cold Damage Over Time Occultist" is a powerhouse that excels at chilling and destroying enemies in all content of the game. It also offers an interesting playstyle, with its main damage coming from an instant-cast nova, draining the life from your foes as you run past them, as well as Vaal Cold Snap's ability to kill on the run.
      Ranger
      The "Crit Elemental Hit Deadeye" takes advantage of the Deadeye's power in terms of clearspeed, and Elemental Hit's raw damage to crush any content the game has to offer. Since the rework of Elemental Hit, it has retained top tier status, a chaining, zooming, flaming murder machine.
      With the buff to Ballistas this league, the "Siege Ballista Raider" is a great choice. This build offers raw damage, spread across tons of totems, and you play as a powerful commander of an army of siege weaponry. It also boasts high single-target damage, keeping up with the boss-killing meta we can expect to see this league.
      The "Toxic Rain Pathfinder" has a lot going for it, especially as a starter with the new buffs to Quill Rain. It is a great option to take on the whole game, with extremely high damage, an excellent levelling experience, and a highly enjoyable endgame playstyle. If you are looking for a less traditional bow build, this one is a great option.
      Templar
      The "Spark Inquisitor" is a great option to try out the new ailment changes that have arrived with 3.9, with the build being exceptionally strong in the late-game (while still being a great league starter). It can capably deal with both single-target and clear damage requirements, while still being fairly simple to play. The long distance and CC-capabilities ensure a smooth and safe playstyle that can even comfortably fit into Hardcore leagues.
      Scion
      The "Elemental Hit Ascendant" is an excellent boss damage dealer, something that looks to be a great boon in the new league, as well as having strong survivability and excellent clear speeds. This combination of damage and toughness is a great choice for anyone hoping to head into a Hardcore league.
      The "Scourge Arrow Ascendant" may have received a nerf, but it is still a powerful build, and has come to be one of the best known and most played bow builds. If you are looking to balance drawbacks with immense power, and shred your enemies to bits, this build is a unique and fun option, with lots of versatility. 
    • By Oxygen
      Oxygen discusses loot boxes and their moral implication.
      Hearthstone and Overwatch's overwhelming financial success have pushed Heroes of the Storm to adopt a similar monetization model by introducing its own loot box system back in May 2017. How have loot boxes changed the landscape of gaming? What are some of their moral implications?
      Table of contents
      A brief history of randomized microtransactions
      Back in November, Star Wars Battlefront 2 players denounced Electronic Arts' unscrupulous business practices that required players to spend an exorbitant number of in-game hours to be on an equal footing with players who could instead opt to spent large amounts of money on randomly generated in-game items... in a game they had already purchased for some $60. To most, EA had gone too far with so-called pay-to-win which, to add insult to injury, was highly randomized. This controversy served to put randomized microtransactions under the global spotlight, prompting comments and actions from lawmakers and political figures globally.
      Such microtransactions are far from new, however.  Back in 2007, Zhengtu Network was looking to monetize its homonymous game in Asian countries. To understand the move, it should be said that Asian markets were quite different from their American and European counterparts: players generally didn't purchase full titles and instead relied chiefly on internet cafés and copying games to play. Instead of relying on base sales to generate a profit, Zhengtu turned to loot boxes, which made sense for a young population of gamers that were much more receptive to a nickel-and-dime approach. The experiment proved so successful that it bred an entire genre of "free-to-pay" games, particularly on mobile platforms, that would come to solely exploit microtransactions to thrive.
      Western regions were first exposed to microtransactions in 2009 through those Zynga compulsion loop-driven Facebook social "games" we've all been involuntarily exposed to. Team Fortress 2 would soon come up with its twist on microtransactions, in 2011, by introducing the loot box system we are so familiar with. Valve's logic was that by making their game mostly available for free, gamers would flock to the popular title in such numbers that even if only a small fraction of those players ended up spending, they would generate a profit. Valve won their bid, Team Fortress 2's population grew by a staggering factor of 12, and many mainstream games, including games from the FIFA, Counter-Strike, and Battlefield franchises, League of Legends, and, of course Overwatch, would follow suit.
      The Star Wars controversy I discussed earlier happened to explode because of the franchise's humongous cultural significance that allowed the controversy to reach way beyond the social circles of those who would normally be concerned. In other words, non-gamers were, for the first time, exposed to the concept of loot boxes. To top it off, Star Wars Battlefront 2's loot box system was a particularly insidious blend of ludicrous costs, a highly pay-to-win scheme, and a high base game cost for what was essentially the re-release of a decade-old game. One of the most important conversations that would stem from the controversy is about the very nature of loot boxes and whether or not they should be considered a form of gambling, and thus regulated.
      Why microtransactions? And how?
      From a business standpoint, making a product free to then rely solely on post-consumption microtransactions may come off as an odd decision; why run risk of not seeing a return on your investment by not charging consumers right away? The context of games, and specifically, multiplayer games, is quite different from what I might call traditional consumerism: players are also part of the product, as without functional matchmaking, multiplayer games obviously stop working. Social bonds also tend to keep players more invested, and more players simply means more opportunities for bonds to develop.
      The real prize, however, lies in a specific player profile known as a whale. Whales are essentially players who spend a ludicrous amount of money on otherwise free products. In its 2016 report on monetization, Swrve demonstrated that a mere 0.19% (!) of players contributed to some 48% of freemium games' revenue. Doesn't it make sense, then, to try and cater to said whales? How do you do it? Besides the importance of creating an appealing game, I believe that there are four main components to what we might colloquially call whale hunting.
      I) Anemic time-to-reward ratios and "unreachable" goals
      One of the most typical aspects of competitive free-to-play games is that they almost ubiquitously require players to spend a steady amount of money to stay in the loop. One of the most egregious examples of this might be Hearthstone, for which it is technically possible for a given player to build a competitive deck through sheer playtime. However, doing so would be extremely time-consuming and would require of this player that they focus on a single deck, leaving them extremely vulnerable to metagame shifts (which forcibly occur every time an expansion is released) and unable to experiment. The key to creating a dependence on microtransaction lies in making in-game currency gains so anemic that players feel forced to make steady real money purchases. Going back to our Hearthstone example, and assuming a steady rate of 8 matches per hour, your average player (50% win/loss ratio) might be able to purchase a pack after some 7.5 hours of playtime, daily quests notwithstanding. Since individual packs cost $1.50 USD, this time could be valued at about $0.20 an hour, making a minimum wage job rather appealing by comparison. Although you are hopefully enjoying yourself playing Hearthstone during this time, any player looking to be a serious contender will absolutely have to invest into the game.
      Daniel Friedman from Polygon did the legwork for me and produced a fair estimation for the yearly cost of sustaining a reasonable Hearthstone collection: $400, including in-game currency gains. For a whale, this isn't a lot. By comparison, $170 USD a year will keep you completely competitive in Heroes of the Storm, though in reality, you could get away with spending much less by regularly completing daily quests and skipping weak heroes. Again, for a whale, this isn't a lot. As a developer, you then run into this problem of needing to balance the needs of freeloaders, casual players, and whales. On one hand, purchases that have a direct effect on game play (cards in card games, characters in MOBAs, weapons in FPSs, etc.) must remain relatively accessible to all. On the other hand, you need to have content for whales to spend on. And this is exactly why most free-to-play games feature a large amount of expensive cosmetic items. At the time of writing, building a full non-golden Hearthstone card collection would set you back nearly $2,000 USD. For a full golden collection, I've seen estimates ranging between $10,000 and $20,000 USD. This number would increase by approximately $3,000 with every new expansion. For the majority of us, this sounds insane. To a whale, this is a goal.
      II) Artificial rarity
      Scarcity breeds desire. De Beers exploited this back in the 1930s to artificially inflate the price of its diamonds. Blizzard too does this across its microtransaction games; inherently, high rarity items in Hearthstone, Overwatch, and Heroes of the Storm aren't more powerful (less so for Hearthstone) or attractive (this is subjective, of course) than other items. By assigning rare, epic, and legendary qualities to their items – which is rather clever, by the way, as we have been groomed by years upon years of World of Warcraft to respect these rarities and associated colours – Blizzard is justifying steeper crafting costs and lower pulling chances when there would otherwise be no objective reason to make certain items harder to acquire. Item rarity becomes particularly easy for players to hate, and justifiably so, when it is directly tied to in-game power levels. But for big spenders, high rarity simply becomes synonymous with quality, regardless of the item's intrinsic value, not unlike luxury brands.
      Item rarity isn't the only way Blizzard (and other companies; I'm not trying to specifically criticise Blizzard here, but I just happen to know their products well enough) are creating artificial rarity. Although card games such as Hearthstone naturally conjure events whenever a new expansion comes out, Overwatch and Heroes of the Storm very carefully plan time-limited in-game events with event-exclusive and sometimes limited (in the sense that this is your one chance of acquiring them) cosmetic items to imbue players with a hollow sense of urgency. These events often have specific loot boxes, and the items they contain are invariably more expensive than year-round items for players to craft to further incentivise purchases.
      III) Obfuscation of costs
      Let's have a short quiz.
      a) How much is a legendary Hearthstone card worth?
      Surprised? So am I.
      b) How much is a legendary Heroes of the Storm item worth?
      ...surprised again? So was I. And I'm actually slightly embarrassed to admit that it took me a few minutes to math this one out. Why? I had to convert my local Canadian currency into a number of "Gems" before looking into making a loot chest purchase. The insidious bit is that whenever I tried to purchase a specific number of chests, I'd always either have some leftover gems or have to go for a less appealing package. At this rate, this point is just writing itself out.
      Gold, gems, dust, credits, "not-money". Whatever you call them, they're much easier to spend than actual cash, not unlike real life credit, and particularly for impulse purchases. You'll notice that such currencies are often purchased by the thousand, which only serves to further disconnect consumers from their money.

      You look like candy. I don't mind spending you at all.
      The random nature of loot boxes and card packs only serves to further obfuscate how much players are actually spending for what they're getting. If you've ever wondered why players weren't just allowed to pick whatever card (or cosmetic, in the case of loot boxes) they needed from packs since cards have no resale value and cannot be traded with other players, this is it.  And if you've ever wondered why obvious filler such as Sewer Crawler or Worgen Greaser gets printed with every expansion, there's your answer again.
      IV) Steady compulsion looping
      No random microtransaction system can be successful without providing its target market with a highly controlled but steady stream of merchandise. Games such as Heroes of the Storm offer a frontloaded number of loot chests to hook its players in, then cleverly use the "progression" system to regularly feed them with bits of dopamine. The player profile has a section dedicated to indicating how close players are to acquiring their next reward as a constant reminder. The tiered loot chest system even acts as a small knob to control exactly how much players should be getting, and when. Items such as Stimpacks have the dual effect of doubling the rate of the compulsion looping schedule and instilling players with a false sense of faster progression to become particularly addictive. Positive reinforcement variable ratio schedules are also found under the form of a mechanic known by players as a "pity timer" which ensures that at least one legendary item will be collected every 35th loot chest (every 39th card pack in Hearthstone) to ensure a certain level of randomized microtransaction loyalty.
      The visuals and sounds that accompany the opening of loot boxes is specifically designed to heighten excitement, with higher rarity items being generally accompanied by flashier animations and more exciting sound effects.
      Ultimately, the goal of the system is to create a form of extrinsic motivation that encourages players to remain active and incentivises them to make purchases. Daily quests fulfill a similar purpose, though they obviously cannot be purchased.
      Are loot boxes and card packs a form of gambling?
      With randomized microtransactions under the proverbial spotlight, I believe this question is going to be a big one in the near future. As of right now however, the answer varies broadly depending on who you ask; many American and European countries are in the process of studying the question, whereas most Asian countries have already legislated. Given the different gaming culture, as was explained in the second paragraph of this article, this makes sense: Asian countries have been way more exposed to microtransactions – and their effects – than western countries have.
      In an unexpectedly liberal move, China dropped a bomb in December 2016 when it announced that game publishers dealing in the country would have to reveal the draw chances of randomized virtual items and services. Furthermore, this new law outright banned loot box-like systems. Blizzard complied with the new legislation in a particularly crass way by instead selling meaningless amounts of in-game currency (dust for Hearthstone, credits for Overwatch, etc.) and giving out an equal amount of packs or loot boxes as a "gift" for purchasing said currency. I'm not joking.
      Of course, this is just one step towards regulation (or not) in one country, and, as stated earlier, distinct countries are tackling the issue at different speeds. However, I suspect the battle to have far-reaching consequences. In the US, lawsuits against analogous systems, notably, Pokémon cards, was ultimately dismissed back in 1999. Why? Simply put, booster packs were deemed to "not be harmful enough" despite passing the gambling test, which serves to identify what constitutes gambling in the US. How do you perform this test? Look for the three following elements:
      Consideration; basically, a cost or "risk" Chance; an unpredictable outcome (what will I win, or; will I win something at all?) Prize; what you will gain if you do win (for binary gambling), or; what you will gain (i.e. cards, for non-binary gambling) Notice anything? Loot boxes and card packs – though only those purchased with real currency – fit the bill. I've seen individuals argue that loot boxes could not be considered gambling because they always had a yield, but the test cares little about the nature of the yield as long as it is directly tied to consideration and chance. Jurisprudence has set a rather strange factor – harm, which, I have no idea how the judge evaluated – as one of the main component for future lawsuits. And so, we must then ask whether loot boxes and analogous systems are in fact harmful. Some have hypothesized that they can contribute to video game addiction, but the very existence of this disorder is still being debated. Perhaps we should instead look at gambling addiction to make a case, though we are headed deep into political and moral territories. Who should be in control of their own fate? Let's not go there just yet.
      Moral and design concerns
      It is with much noise and celebrating that Heroes of the Storm moved away from its standard microtransaction system to embrace loot chests fully back in May 2017. Most of the changes brought in by Heroes 2.0 would ultimately serve to support the introduction of randomized microtransactions.
      Indeed, if economic research showed that loot boxes were not more lucrative than typical microtransactions (such as buying exactly what you want, such as a given Hearthstone card or Heroes of the Storm skin for a set price), they simply wouldn't exist. They are predatory in the sense that they exploit basic behavioural traits to make more money than a typical, non-random system would.
      The success of loot boxes becomes particularly terrifying when certain fundamental games design principles have to be twisted to promote the appeal of purchasing loot boxes. Games such as Overwatch are hardly affected. Other games, such as Hearthstone, are incentivised to make more powerful cards rarer to increase potential profits, though ultimately, this is a thing we have come to accept – unjustifiably, perhaps? – from card games. Other much more reprehensible game examples literally tie player power to randomly finding certain items. Loot boxes and their content need to be advertised, too, which distracts from the game.

      Hey MVP! Don't mind my skin and banner, by the way. Cough. But they do look nice. If only you had them, you could be just as good as I am...
      The human demand for gambling is undeniable. Unlike video game addiction, however, gambling addiction is recognized as a mental disorder. Whether certain whales are affected by the disorder is difficult to tell, but vices ultimately tend to affect the most vulnerable of us. Controlling certain behaviour is excessively difficult, if not impossible, but knowing that my favourite games may be subsidised by people whose lives are compromised by gambling problems is always a sad thought. And although I generally try and avoid making unfounded assertions, I can't help but to question the effects of exposing children and adolescents to gambling, regardless of the form. This is particularly worrisome as younger gamers are being groomed by popular mobile games to see such microtransactions as completely normal.
      TL;DR
      Electronic Arts' massive blunder with Star Wars Battlefront 2's loot crate system caused a global awareness of randomized microtransactions, prompting reactions from several political figured around the world. Random microtransactions would be considered a form of gambling by US law, but existing jurisprudence tells us that they are unlikely to be controlled unless objective harm can be proved, just as with physical collectible cards. Random microtransactions exploit human behavioural weaknesses to generate significantly more profit than traditional transactions.
×
×
  • Create New...