Jump to content
FORUMS
Oxygen

On Loot Boxes and Morality

Recommended Posts

As an interesting note.  I stopped playing HoTS almost completely; largely due to the heroes 2.0 change.  But as a long time MTG player, I have had no problem with hearthstone, despite it being largely the same.  I mean, it is completely understandable since I have been. . . indoctrinated into the randomness of collectable cards (and hey I can trade in 4 of these for one of the same rarity, can't do that in magic!).  Which I think just shows the potential dangers of this sort of system.  Once it becomes common place, we just sort of accept it for the norm and don't really question it.  

Edited by VaraTreledees
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Oxygen said:
  • Random microtransactions exploit human behavioural weaknesses to generate significantly more profit than traditional transactions.

Nihil novi sub sole...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Keizoku said:

Nihil novi sub sole...

Oh, I know, but loot boxes being relatively new makes them pretty unknown for most.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love loot boxes. They helped me get rid of my gaming addiction and start enjoying real life again.

Thank you, gaming industry.

Sarcasm aside I think the real question isn't "are loot boxes a form of gambling" but rather are they designed to trigger dopamine releases in your brain - just like social media "likes" - in order to get you addicted.

I think the answer is obviously yes.

Edited by Scambug
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being rewarded for playing the game, and not absolutely have to pay for ingame content, is for me a great motivation to keep playing. I like the excitement of getting the lootboxes. Even if there can be long between something really good comes up, I still want to collect it all, because of this system. Just keep them boxes comming my way :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A thoughtful post, but factually incorrect. Microtransactions have been part of gaming for longer than a decade. Commercial MUDs first pioneered RMTs and microtransactions (and the virtual goods model in general) far earlier. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as you're willing to pay monthly, Blizzard will respect you.
The only reason for a corporation is to make money to satisfy its investors.

If the players here are happy too, that can always continue.

But if the subscription rates go down, as with many similar games, they have to find another way to make their shareholders happy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Oxygen said:

Valve's logic was that by making their game mostly available for free, gamers would flock to the popular title in such numbers that even if only a small fraction of those players ended up spending, they would generate a profit.

They are not wrong. It is actually a really smart marketing strategy, and as you stated through your article, it is a way to "toy" with the human nature. Just like South Park showed us, people LOVE free stuff. "Wow, so I can play this awesome game without spending a dime? FUCK YEAH!"

From Valve's perspective, it's a win-win situation. With free games more people will play their stuff, spread popularity, so more people will play. And with their constant updates do TF2 they won the playerbase trust and loyalty; therefore the most loving fans will spend money at good will to support Valve. Which is not wrong. It's, all in all, a healthy relationship.

But everything changed when the Fire Nation EA attacked.

10 hours ago, Oxygen said:

One of the most typical aspects of competitive free-to-play games is that they almost ubiquitously require players to spend a steady amount of money to stay in the loop.

Yes, this is where things get fucked up. Hearthstone actually has a logic behind this because it tries its best to simulate a real-life card game experience, where one has to buy Boosters and Packs to find their desired cards. I'm not defending them, but sadly that is how it works. Predating on human basic instincts is something that is done since the dawn of humanity. Even the religion shows this with the Adam and Eve.

At least in Heroes of the Storm it's mainly cosmetics, which I'm perfectly fine with. Sure, I really REALLY want those Bucaneer Falstad and Maraudin Muradin skins, but that won't ruin my experience playing the game nor give me disadvantages.

10 hours ago, Oxygen said:

The human demand for gambling is undeniable.

Much like I said above, humans exploit their own basic instincts since the forever. If there are two things we can be certain about humanity is that we are ruled by boobs and gambling; it is an undeniable fact. Why do you think Bender's most famous quote is about "blackjack and hookers"?

__________________________________________________

Great article, by the way, as expected from our former Ducklord. I actually enjoy lootboxes by the fact that it doesn't force me to actually spend real money. As long they're not using cheap pay-to-win strategies as EA. Cosmetics are fine as lootbox contents.

Personal story below.

Spoiler

My first contact with lootboxes was through playing Mass Effect 3 Multiplayer, where it was pay-to-win situation, because lootboxes contained characters and weapons. However, since the multiplayer mode is a coop survival against waves of AI enemies, it is not as impactful because you'll be having fun regardless of not having the best equipment. Plus the game's leveling system can make your character have presence in the matches if you build them well. The only classes that are REALLY dependent on top-tier weapons are Soldiers and Infiltrators (the "physical-based" classes), while the other classes can be built around their Power-based cooldowns ("mage-like"), which generally means that a solid build can make a difference even if you have the shittiest gear. So in the end, it didn't matter to me because I liked the "mage-classes" better.

I don't (usually) really get obssessed and frustrated that I don't get one of those Legendary Skins I've been wanting for a long time, so when I finally get them without expecting anything, it is a pleasant surprise.

The only time I've spent money in Heroes of the Storm was to buy The Butcherlisk skin, and after doing so I felt very bad, using my hard earned cash to buy a virtual cosmetic in a game, specially since in Brazil the taxing on dolars really hurts, so skins' values were 3x as expensive. Like, "I could be using this money for something more useful".

Edited by Valhalen
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One aspect I think is key to micro-transactions as a business model and possible as a whole is constructing a sense of legitimacy or "fairness", and the thought my brain ran away with while reading this post was how daily quests very cleverly tie something with arbitrary value to something with immutable or fixed value.

The rewards from daily quests or regular log-ins often have no actual value from their outset, their supply is limitless, it costs nothing to create or distribute them, their value is determined by how they fit into the rest of the system, how many funbucks do you need to save up for something with an actual gameplay effect.

But the reward is only one of the variables here, the other variable is time, the daily part, and since time waits for no man, this is a variable that wont bend no matter how seductively your credit card details oogle the premium currency menu. Time passes at the same rate for everyone.

The rewards, the arbitrary value, entirely controlled by the company in charge become seemingly based on a system of distribution that is forever equal in judgement, lending it a sense of legitimacy. "How could daily quests be unfair? Time has no bias."

While you could dispute if this gives a sense of fairness or even has any effect on the perception of things, it's hard to deny that by attaching something with value that would otherwise fluctuate with trends or, god forbid, be decided by the players themselves, to a universal aspect of how we experience life, the true value of the reward is greatly obscured, as to decide how much it is really worth, you would need to put a price on your time.

And deciding how much your time is worth is far easier for a team of analysts with a plethora of logistical data about buying habits, playtime, and gaming trends, than it is for someone who just wants to play a game and be entertained.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Valhalen said:

The only time I've spent money in Heroes of the Storm was to buy The Butcherlisk skin, and after doing so I felt very bad, using my hard earned cash to buy a virtual cosmetic in a game, specially since in Brazil the taxing on dolars really hurts, so skins' values were 3x as expensive. Like, "I could be using this money for something more useful".

Every time I spend the $50 dollars at the release of a Hearthstone expansion, I feel exactly the same way.  I really enjoy playing the game and unfortunately, you need to spend at least that $50 at the expansion release to keep up.  I play pretty regularly and when the next expansion is released, I generally have all the commons, all the rares and about half of the epics.  Usually 5-8 legendaries.  It feels so bad to be forced to spend this $50 dollars each time but without it, there is no way I could play and keep up.

 

8 hours ago, VaraTreledees said:

indoctrinated into the randomness of collectable cards (and hey I can trade in 4 of these for one of the same rarity, can't do that in magic!).

Vara, you are looking at this completely wrong.  Magic is a trading card game.  Hearthstone is not.  That is a huge difference in how much your duplicate cards are worth.  I'm not going to explain this for you as Alec here at Icy Veins already does for us.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, seeth07 said:

Vara, you are looking at this completely wrong.  Magic is a trading card game.  Hearthstone is not.  That is a huge difference in how much your duplicate cards are worth.  I'm not going to explain this for you as Alec here at Icy Veins already does for us.

You sort of missed my point.  Having played collectible card games for my entire life, I have grown accustomed to the random nature of them.  Which means when I started playing hearthstone, another card game, I never really questioned the loot distribution system.  It never bothered me, because that is how I expected it to work from previous card games.  However, I hated HotS's change to the loot system, despite being nearly identical to that of hearthstone (in fact it is arguably better since you are only gambling on random cosmetic things as opposed to stuff that actually affects the game play).The little quip about being able to trade them in for 1/4th the value was just me being glib.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, seeth07 said:
9 hours ago, VaraTreledees said:

indoctrinated into the randomness of collectable cards (and hey I can trade in 4 of these for one of the same rarity, can't do that in magic!).

Vara, you are looking at this completely wrong.  Magic is a trading card game.  Hearthstone is not.  That is a huge difference in how much your duplicate cards are worth.  I'm not going to explain this for you as Alec here at Icy Veins already does for us.

No, but as Vara said, you can trade 4 cards for 1 of the same rarity, So,  if you have 4 usless epics, you can dust they and craft the one you need...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, prankquean said:

A thoughtful post, but factually incorrect. Microtransactions have been part of gaming for longer than a decade. Commercial MUDs first pioneered RMTs and microtransactions (and the virtual goods model in general) far earlier. 

I'll certainly look into that and amend the post to reflect that if my findings are interesting enough. Thanks for the comment!

5 hours ago, Valhalen said:

Much like I said above, humans exploit their own basic instincts since the forever. If there are two things we can be certain about humanity is that we are ruled by boobs and gambling; it is an undeniable fact. Why do you think Bender's most famous quote is about "blackjack and hookers"?

Boobs, I can understand. Gambling is just... dopamine? Perhaps?

3 hours ago, Sepulchritude said:

One aspect I think is key to micro-transactions as a business model and possible as a whole is constructing a sense of legitimacy or "fairness", and the thought my brain ran away with while reading this post was how daily quests very cleverly tie something with arbitrary value to something with immutable or fixed value.

That's exactly why boxes might sound appealing; that's certainly an insidious I've fallen prey to myself. Something about my time being devalued so much.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Oxygen said:

Boobs, I can understand. Gambling is just... dopamine? Perhaps?

Pretty much. The unknown always mess with people's heads. And the idea of risking something in exchange of another of greater value also has a massive impact in the psyche because it can easily overdose one with dopamine and lead to addiction.

For example, gambling is severely strong in the Asian countries, specially in Japan, with the Gashapon and Pachinko machines. In a similar vein, in the Western people love slot machines and card games like poker and blackjack. You win once, win twice, and keep going, trying to win more. A paralel with Heroes of the Storm, for example, would be the reroll mechanic and pity roll, like you mentioned in the original post.

Sometimes I burn my gold with rerolls, because it runs pretty much like this: "Godamnit, 5 common items! Maybe if I reroll once I can get something useful. *Rerolls* Ok, there is 1 rare and 4 commons. I think I'll reroll just one more time to see if an Epic show up... *Rerolls* Whelp, no, 2 rares and 2 commons... Maybe just one more time. *Rerolls* FUCK, 5 commons again!"

Edited by Valhalen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Scambug said:

I love loot boxes. They helped me get rid of my gaming addiction and start enjoying real life again.

Thank you, gaming industry.

Sarcasm aside I think the real question isn't "are loot boxes a form of gambling" but rather are they designed to trigger dopamine releases in your brain - just like social media "likes" - in order to get you addicted.

I think the answer is obviously yes.

PSA: Basically everything that you like triggers dopamine releases in your brain. That's why you like it. Saying something is "designed to trigger dopamine releases in your brain in order to get you addicted" is basically just describing anything meant to appeal to people.

That's not to downplay the seriousness of people's problems with addiction. I'm not here to make light of anyone's struggles. But lately people seem to throw around talk of dopamine and addictiveness as if it's inherently a bad thing, when in reality it's pretty much part of the basic functionality of human brains.

Regarding loot boxes, I'm not sure how they're much different than trading cards, randomized collectible figurines, etc. except that they're digital now. I do agree that the "gems"/pseudo-currency thing can feel pretty disgusting considering how easy it makes it to lose track of how much you're actually spending, but then again, is even that that much different than the longstanding marketing convention of ending prices in 99 cents so that your brain thinks of a $3.99 item as $3 rather than $4? The job of marketing departments has always been to manipulate people to get as much money as possible out of their pockets. Expecting them to be ethical while doing so is* somewhere along the spectrum of naive to bizarre.

TL;DR - The question isn't "Is this ethical?", it's "Is this something that should be regulated, and if so, how?"

For example, one could suggest that digital marketplaces (such as the HotS collections tab) which use pseudo-currencies ("gems") should be required to show real currency price conversions alongside the gem prices on all items.

*At least in my opinion. One could argue ad nauseam about business ethics, which I don't really want to get into here, but my stance is that corporations are inherently non-ethical entities. If we as consumers / society wish them to behave or not behave in certain ways, then it's our job to regulate them, not their job to behave ethically out of the goodness of their nonexistent hearts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, clepsydriska said:

*At least in my opinion. One could argue ad nauseam about business ethics, which I don't really want to get into here, but my stance is that corporations are inherently non-ethical entities. If we as consumers / society wish them to behave or not behave in certain ways, then it's our job to regulate them, not their job to behave ethically out of the goodness of their nonexistent hearts.

I agree with your post, but we run into issues, however, when the will of the people becomes disconnected with the political systems in place. One lobbyist having their way might void the opinion of a million individuals, just as one strange lawsuit decision (the Pokémon one) will forever affect future decisions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not really into gambling. I have not spent a dime on HotS (and I don't play other Blizzard games atm), and I don't plan on doing it. Never ever played the lottery, or even poker, blackjack, etc in my whole life.

Does that make me an alien?

I have, however, spent A LOT on Dota 2 cosmetics. That was because I could buy exactly what I wanted in the Community Market. I didn't risk losing money because of acquiring "a chance to earn something I wanted" as in a loot box, treasure chest, or whatever, but I spent money in buying exactly what I wanted.

Edited by Leadblast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Leadblast said:

I have, however, spent A LOT on Dota 2 cosmetics. That was because I could buy exactly what I wanted in the Community Market. I didn't risk losing money because of acquiring "a chance to earn something I wanted" as in a loot box, treasure chest, or whatever, but I spent money in buying exactly what I wanted.

I think a lot of people are in the same boat, but I'll make the fair (I think?) assumption that randomized microtransactions just generate more profits. Heroes made the switch for a reason back in May.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/3/2018 at 10:16 AM, Dejo93 said:

As long as it's just optional cosmetics I'm fine. Blizzard isn't as stupid as EA and actually respects the playerbase.

Have you heard of hearthstone?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The things is... I have about 130 items in HoTS that I've never checked out. I couldn't care less about sprays and voicelines, I even removed their hotkeys. I care about skins somewhat, but not near enough to consider spending money on it. The only thing I care about is boosters and heroes, but they are extremely rare. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Makrangoncias said:

The things is... I have about 130 items in HoTS that I've never checked out. I couldn't care less about sprays and voicelines, I even removed their hotkeys. I care about skins somewhat, but not near enough to consider spending money on it. The only thing I care about is boosters and heroes, but they are extremely rare. 

I think this is a point many are neglecting; although Heroes does shower you with loot, it's generally very unappealing because most of it is fluff and overlaps; I have about 9 Zeratul skins, for instance, but I only ever use one of them.

DotA II was thinking ahead with its cosmetic system, and the Heroes devs certainly didn't pick up on that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Blainie
      Apply now to join our WoW Classic writing team!
      We are recruiting a Paladin-class writer for WoW Classic, as well as additional writers for non-class content guides.
      As many of you may already know, we are currently growing our WoW Classic section on the site and populating it with guides for all areas of the game.
      We are recruiting writers for the following guides:
      Paladin class guide: This will involve writing a full guide for all of the viable specs in WoW Classic, just as we currently have for the other classes. The guide will mainly be PvE-focused, but there will be a PvP section that you will also be required to complete. Non-class guides: This will involve working alongside other writers to complete guides on professions, dungeons, raids, and zones in WoW Classic. You will not be writing any class-specific content, but instead you will be creating "general" guides for the game. Requirements
      You must have a strong command of the English language, most importantly in its written form. While this role is open to all, native speakers are preferred. You will need a deep understanding of WoW Classic's mechanics and, in the case of the class writer position, you must fully understand and be familiar with playing as a Paladin at the highest level of "Vanilla" WoW. You will be expected to put out a steady flow of content, with frequent updates as required.  You must be at least 18 years of age. Remuneration
      This is a paid position, with a revenue sharing agreement (on all content created by the applicant) that will be explained and discussed in the later stages of the recruitment process. If you are interested in the position and feel that you might be the right person for the job, you can send us an email at jobs@icy-veins.com. There is no strict format for applying, so you can complete your application in any way that you feel is appropriate. Please note that, due to there being no strict format, we will treat all correspondence with us part of your application. We will conduct interviews with the top choices following a reviewing period.
      There is currently no deadline for applications, but earlier applications will be looked at immediately, given the release date of the game closing in.
    • By Blainie
      We are recruiting a Path of Exile writer to join our team at PoE Vault!
      With the new League well underway, we are looking for a new guide writer to join our team over at our Path of Exile site, PoE Vault, to help expand the ever-growing library of builds.
      With the new League well underway, we are looking for a new guide writer to join our team over at our Path of Exile site, PoE Vault, to help expand the ever-growing library of builds. If you're a veteran of the game with a strong command of written English, then this might be the perfect position for you!
      Responsibilities
      You will be creating guides. The main priority would be build guides, but there will be opportunities to work on more general projects that look at gameplay and League mechanics, rather than just builds. You will be expected to maintain and update your guides as required by patches. You will be required to respond to feedback and comments left on your guides, as well as make changes according to the feedback when necessary. Requirements
      You must have a strong command of the English language, most importantly in its written form. While this role is open to all, native speakers are preferred. You will need a deep understanding of Path of Exile's mechanics and the current meta surrounding the game. You will be expected to put out a steady flow of content, with frequent updates or new builds.  You must be at least 18 years of age. Remuneration
      This is a paid position, with a revenue sharing agreement (on all content created by the applicant) that will be explained and discussed in the later stages of the recruitment process. If you are interested in the position and feel that you might be the right person for the job, you can send us an email at jobs@poe-vault.com. There is no strict format for applying, so you can complete your application in any way that you feel is appropriate. Please note that, due to there being no strict format, we will treat all correspondence with us part of your application. We will conduct interviews with the top choices following a reviewing period.
      There is currently no deadline for applications, but this post will be updated when one is chosen.
    • By Starym
      We decided to cover Borderlands 3 and hope the reaction will be positive. This first post details what our plans are and why we chose this game.
      We're trying something a little different here on Icy Veins, as we thought we'd try covering Borderlands 3 as a bit of an experiment, and see if our community might be interested in something non-Blizzard. This is a bit of a personal one for me (Starym), as I'm always looking for that next Diablo-like fix and I've been a fan of Borderlands for a long time. I thought that there's probably plenty of other people like me here on Icy Veins that would be interested in alternatives while we wait (and wait and wait) for Diablo 4 and might like to hear some info about them. Also, in case you were wondering, this isn't a paid post or anything similar, just my personal attempt to add something to the Icy Veins community.

      So we're going to be covering some Borderlands-related news here, as well as a few roundups of what's already been announced, and hopefully we'll also be doing guides when the game releases. But first, why did we pick this game as our first non-Blizzard title and what's the game actually about?

      Why Borderlands?
      Borderlands as a franchise, and the third installment in particular, seemed like a great fit for our community, with the focus on loot, endgame, character building and a lot of other RPG elements - in short, the game is basically a Diablo First Person Shooter. The new game will be much more expansive than previous entries, both in terms of gameplay content, loot, customization depth (both systemic and cosmetic) - pushing it a little bit more towards MMO territory, while still being a 1-4 player co-op game, so the WoW crowd might also get a kick out of it. With many character setups to explore across the 4 classes, an insane number of guns, shields, grenades and other items to combine into a build, there's plenty of space for guides and character optimization, so there will be a lot to cover, and hopefully we can be a resource to the general Borderlands community as well.
      Those were the reasons we thought we should cover the game, but why should you try it?
      As with Diablo, the core gameplay was already very good in Borderlands 2 and it's being significantly improved in 3. Customization depth has also been massively increased, bringing many more options and builds to the table. Co-op play is much better this time around as well, with lower level players being able to play with higher levels seamlessly. The guns and loot in general has been made even more interesting with special manufacturer perks, alternate fire on all guns and much, much more. But most of all, it's great to play it with friends and one of the best co-op games around, while still maintaining an interesting single player experience as well.

      The Basics of BL3
      We'll be covering all the new features and what you can look forward to in separate articles, including all the changes from BL2, but we also wanted to take a look at the basic info for the game in case you weren't familiar with the franchise or just wanted to know what it's really all about.
      Release date: September 13th, 2019 What is it: a 1-4 player co-operative PvE focused FPS, drop in-drop out "looter-shooter" with leveling Character builds: each of the 4 Vault Hunters (classes) has 3 skill trees and 3 different active abilities to choose from, as well as a huge amount of guns, shields, grenades and class mods, all with their own properties and stats Itemization: Loot rarity up to legendary (and beyond?), item manufacturers give unique properties to items (Hyperion guns have shields attached, Atlas guns have tracking bullets, Maliwan have different elemental properties you can cycle through, etc.), different item components (barrel, sight, etc.) change the properties of guns which takes the number of guns in the game into the billions Extremely unique weapons and items: guns with legs, grenades that split into more that then split into more etc, guns that mock you when you miss, guns with infinite ammo, guns that fire hails of bullets in a descending arc, shields that drop booster packs when you get shot, and much more Quests, experience, leveling, side-challenges that give you paragon-like points to distribute across all characters Vehicles and vehicle customization, both cosmetic and systemic (different gun turrets, wheels vs. hover pads etc.) Sci-fi/space setting, with 5 different planets to visit, your own spaceship home base A lot of humor/satire in the storyline, quests and characters A big focus on the endgame
      Stay tuned for the detailed rundown of Borderlands 3's new and returning features, and we hope you'll enjoy this addition to the site and perhaps even give the game a try. Also, here's the full gameplay reveal live-stream, in case you wanted to see more:
    • By Blainie
      We've put together a list of builds from our Path of Exile site, PoE Vault, for the new league!
      With Patch 3.7.0 hitting Path of Exile with an overhaul to the melee builds and systems, as well as the start of the Legion Challenge League, this is the perfect time to try out a new build for your favourite classes.
      As some of you may already know, we made an announcement last year in December that introduced our Path of Exile guides and news site, PoE Vault. Since then, we have made major improvements to the site, including a full rework of our database, and we are proud to once again feature its content here on Icy Veins for those of you that may have been considering giving the game a go. 
      This post contains 11 builds that have been created and updated for the latest league in Path of Exile, the Legion Challenge League, with a focus on the builds that were once again made available after the changes in Patch 3.7.0. Whether you are a new player or a returning veteran, you should be able to find a new build to try and enjoy!
      For Shadow players, despite the nerfs to the Trickster ascendancy, there are still two great builds to try this league: the Soulrend Trickster build and the Caustic Arrow Trickster build. The Soulrend skill was added in the Synthesis league and quickly gained popularity, due to the incredible survivability of the build, making it a great choice for anyone looking to start the league in cruising comfort. For the Caustic Arrow Trickster, things are definitely more focused on some excellent damage output at early levels through the constantly under-development Caustic Arrow skill. 
      For Templar players, we have three builds, each featuring a different focus between defence and damage. In the Spark Inquisitor build, we have a perfect balance of damage and defence that will excel in any league you may want to try. For those of you that are looking to head into hardcore leagues and are perhaps looking for something a bit safer, then you may want to pick up the Purifying Flame Inquisitor build instead, in which you'll find slightly slower clear times, but excellent regeneration and defensive capabilities. For those of you that are ready to wade through enemies with huge damage potential and no care for their own survival, then the Ancestral Warchief Inquisitor build is definitely one to try this league.
      For those of you that are looking to start this league as a Witch, there's only 1 build on this list for you, but it's a fantastic one! The Storm Brand Elementalist build is an excellent all-rounder, with fast clear times and brilliant mobility.
      Despite having only 1 build on this list, the featured choice for the Marauder has efficiency as its middle name. The Uber Labyrinth Farmer Juggernaught build has been designed to complete Labyrinth runs quickly and comfortably, with massive early-game potential.
      Duelists are the stars of this list and have clocked in 4 builds, all of which have their own strengths and weaknesses. The Cyclone Slayer build has strong levelling capabilities and deals good single-target damage, but momentum is key, as it needs to keep killing in order to survive. On the opposite end of the spectrum, we've got a revival of instant life leech in the form of the Double Strike Gladiator build. If you're looking for strong end-game instead, the Earthquake Slayer build may be the build for you, with the potential to dominate in both softcore and hardcore, achieving excellent levels of Shaper DPS.
      The final build of the post is a brilliant all-rounder that takes shape in the form of the Cyclone Blood and Sand Gladiator build, which benefits from a variety of big buffs in the recent patches that has led to the combination of great damate output and solid defensive stats in the form of high Life, Endurance Charges, Armour and Leech.
    • By Stan
      We're looking for a dedicated writer to cover Hearthstone on our site and here's how you can apply.
      We are thrilled to announce that we are looking for some fresh blood to enter our growing team behind the scenes of Icy Veins! This time, we're looking for a Hearthstone writer who will be of course working from home and communicate with the team through Discord.
      Responsibilities
      News reporting (reposting Blizzard announcements, including, but not limited to patch notes, content patches, interviews, community news, esports). Editorial pieces (own thoughts about the state of the game, upcoming feature, game updates). Contributing to a few decks, maintaining a Tier List, helping with expansion guides. Requirements
      Have strong command of the English language (native speakers are preferred, but not required). Have strong proficiency with Hearthstone. Be able to express your thoughts in a concise, coherent, and engaging manner. Be able to put out a steady flow of content. Be at least 18 years of age. Remuneration
      This is a paid position, with the amount earned by the writer being a share of the amount generated by the news and guides they write. More details about this will be available throughout the recruitment process. Submissions
      E-mail us at jobs@icy-veins.com in order to apply. There is no strict format for applying, so simply try to impress us and remember that we treat all e-mail communication with you as your application. The top choice(s) will be interviewed. There is currently no deadline for applications.
      We're recruiting a Hearthstone writer to join our team!
×
×
  • Create New...