Damien

Questing Miracle Rogue Standard

22 posts in this topic

This thread is for comments about our Questing Miracle Rogue Standard deck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guide mentioned a possible replacement, but I'd like to hear some more opinions, oh Rogue nerds masters: how crucial is Edwin VanCleef? Is this deck functional without him, or is cycling and conceal>cold blood setups are not enough? 

And I guess Xaril, Poisoned Mind is a bad idea, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Paracel said:

Guide mentioned a possible replacement, but I'd like to hear some more opinions, oh Rogue nerds masters: how crucial is Edwin VanCleef? Is this deck functional without him, or is cycling and conceal>cold blood setups are not enough? 

And I guess Xaril, Poisoned Mind is a bad idea, right?

VanCleef is most crucial in those aggro matchups. Depending on what you are facing most of, it can be the difference between winning and losing. Slamming him down on turn 3 can decide a game vs. aggro at that exact moment for 2 reasons:

  1. They most likely can't remove him.
  2. You most likely removed their board with spells before playing him.

Xaril sort of functions in the same way, but he doesn't present anywhere near the same body that Edwin does. You'll need to rely on RNG to give you a useful toxin, since the body of Xaril can be cleared by a 2/1 1-drop.

I think the 2-HP is just too weak. Earthen Ring works since it presents something that needs to be cleared by a stronger minion. 

The deck can definitely work without Edwin, you just don't have that HUGE early-game presence. You'll need to play smarter and will most likely have longer games without him. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Blainie That's pretty much what I thought initially. Exploring the magnificent world of Miracle Rogue is going a long way. I'll [pun] keep my eyes open [/pun].

Also did you just use forum's usual daily post limit of 10 in like 20 minutes? I tuned away for a minute and my notification button just went BOOM!.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Paracel said:

@Blainie That's pretty much what I thought initially. Exploring the magnificent world of Miracle Rogue is going a long way. I'll [pun] keep my eyes open [/pun].

Also did you just use forum's usual daily post limit of 10 in like 20 minutes? I tuned away for a minute and my notification button just went BOOM!.

Rogue is probably my favourite class just because there is indeed so much to explore!

As a mod, I don't really have any sort of post limit :P I can spam you as much as I like!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Paracel said:

Guide mentioned a possible replacement, but I'd like to hear some more opinions, oh Rogue nerds masters: how crucial is Edwin VanCleef? Is this deck functional without him, or is cycling and conceal>cold blood setups are not enough? 

And I guess Xaril, Poisoned Mind is a bad idea, right?

Edwin VanCleef isn't as crucial in the deck as in the other miracle rogue decks, since you already run 2 Questing Adventurers, which work in a similar way. It's still going to hurt a bit, but not as much as it would with the other rogue decks, except for N'Zoth/Unearthed Raptor rogue and tempo rogue as they don't run Edwin VanCleef at all.
Xaril, Poisoned Mind could work as your swap for Edwin VanCleef in control match-ups. The card is alright and the toxins synergize well with Gadgetzan Auctioneers and the stars of the deck - Questing Adventurers. Some of the toxins have useful effects: Kingsblood Toxin for card draw, Briarthorn Toxin for lethal and damage overall, Fadeleaf Toxin for the same reason as Conceal, and Firebloom Toxin for clearing board and going for lethal. Basically, only Bloodthistle Toxin doesn't give you extra advantage.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, positiv2 said:

Edwin VanCleef isn't as crucial in the deck as in the other miracle rogue decks, since you already run 2 Questing Adventurers, which work in a similar way. It's still going to hurt a bit, but not as much as it would with the other rogue decks, except for N'Zoth/Unearthed Raptor rogue and tempo rogue as they don't run Edwin VanCleef at all.
Xaril, Poisoned Mind could work as your swap for Edwin VanCleef in control match-ups. The card is alright and the toxins synergize well with Gadgetzan Auctioneers and the stars of the deck - Questing Adventurers. Some of the toxins have useful effects: Kingsblood Toxin for card draw, Briarthorn Toxin for lethal and damage overall, Fadeleaf Toxin for the same reason as Conceal, and Firebloom Toxin for clearing board and going for lethal. Basically, only Bloodthistle Toxin doesn't give you extra advantage.

Do the questing adventurers survive enough removal?

As a general point of reference, let's say that you use on turn 3:

Prep + Evis + Backstab + The minion

VanCleef would give an 8/8, which survives most turn 4 removal. The QA gives a 5/5, which probably dies to a lot more.

I feel like the QAs are something that you'd play and protect while you buff them, while VanCleef is that massive early-board slam of pressure. Although they interact in a similar way, I can't help but feel like you play them in a completely different way/to obtain a different effect.

What do you think of Xaril as a body? Does it have an effect on his viability as a replacement? Also, opinions vs. aggro?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Blainie said:

Do the questing adventurers survive enough removal?

As a general point of reference, let's say that you use on turn 3:

Prep + Evis + Backstab + The minion

VanCleef would give an 8/8, which survives most turn 4 removal. The QA gives a 5/5, which probably dies to a lot more.

I feel like the QAs are something that you'd play and protect while you buff them, while VanCleef is that massive early-board slam of pressure. Although they interact in a similar way, I can't help but feel like you play them in a completely different way/to obtain a different effect.

What do you think of Xaril as a body? Does it have an effect on his viability as a replacement? Also, opinions vs. aggro?

Questing Adventurers can survive enough removal, but still should be protected by Conceal or Fadeleaf Toxin for a turn.

Even though that would be a nice turn, it happens very rarely. If you have a bad draw, Questing Adventurers are better. A bad turn doesn't hurt them as much, since you can buff them in later turns when you improve your hand. Usually Edwin VanCleef is better, but you can run only one of him the your deck (*cough* Gang Up *cough* - not worth it). 

Control decks will have a way to deal with the 8/8 - SapMulchAldor Peacekeeper/HumilityShadow Word: Death, and some aggro decks will have an answer as well - Power OverwhelmingFrostboltSap again. The 5/5 dies to Fireball or 1-drop beast + Skill CommandSlam + Fiery War Axe or Shadow Strike and stuff I listed for Edwin VanCleef, but on the other hand soft removals, such as Humility or Keeper of Uldaman don't hurt it as much since you can keep gaining stats. The 5/5 in the terms of survivability isn't much behind the 8/8.

Xaril's body is obviously bad and even though you can get Firebloom Toxin to deal with aggro, the body is just too bad for Xaril to be good in aggro matchup. So, yes, it does have an effect on its viability, but I think Xaril, Poisoned Mind is still good enough to be included if you face reasonable amount of aggro. If aggro decks are your main matchup, then you should look for a different replacement. Against aggro I'd prefer an Earthen Ring Farseer.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loving this deck and questing adventurer wins me so much games. 

I even keep it in aggro. You play questing plust removing spells and it creates a body they can't deal with it most of the time. 

Plus every time you use your spells it heals questing adventurer for one. 

Edited by Aexra

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Aexra said:

I even keep it in aggro

I too like to live dangerously.

I'm glad that the deck is working well for you!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this season 30, here is many zoo and midrange shamans. So would blade furry work vs them? or what u think?

Rogue is missing big aoe removal right now, so maybe that is solution?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Number 2 is scientifically proven by Maelstrom Portal and Lightning Storm to be big. You can achieve it with Fan+Spell damage.

Flurry is a huge investment of 4 mana and requires setup through Deadly Poison, which is not consistent and creates card disadvantage most of the time. Don't do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i replaced vancleef with earthen ring,but is there any substitute for thalnos?so far Im running leeroy because of all the equality consecrate murlocdins to provide some extra final burst

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, TheEviscerator said:

i replaced vancleef with earthen ring,but is there any substitute for thalnos?so far Im running leeroy because of all the equality consecrate murlocdins to provide some extra final burst

Leeroy can work, if you need spellpower you can grab Kobold Geomancer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

okay after a bit of experimenting, I started to run 2 violet teacher over thalnos and edwin just as a replacement. paired with conceal it totally screws over zoolock...that was the most satisfying piece of BM i have ever done in ranked. FeelsGoodMan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/27/2016 at 3:32 PM, TheEviscerator said:

okay after a bit of experimenting, I started to run 2 violet teacher over thalnos and edwin just as a replacement. paired with conceal it totally screws over zoolock...that was the most satisfying piece of BM i have ever done in ranked. FeelsGoodMan

Around what rank are you playing? Also, how does it do vs. other decks than zoo? Just to help out those that might be reading :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2016 at 10:38 AM, Blainie said:

Around what rank are you playing? Also, how does it do vs. other decks than zoo? Just to help out those that might be reading :)

Im actually not that high,at around rank 14-15,and apart from zoo i also face some OTK pallys who like to equality consecrate then and have nothing agianst adventurers.however against shaman it just depends on whether they draw lightning storm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, TheEviscerator said:

Im actually not that high,at around rank 14-15,and apart from zoo i also face some OTK pallys who like to equality consecrate then and have nothing agianst adventurers.however against shaman it just depends on whether they draw lightning storm

While going up against shaman, if you can get a good Questing Adventurer or Edwin VanCleef or both (like at least 6 to 8 health), Lightning Storm should not do much, as even with high roll, it needs +3 spell damage to kill a 6 health minion.

Most important thing against shaman is how you utilize (first you should find them of course) your Conceals. If not, Hex will find you before other stuff probably and you would not want that obviously.

As a player whose main is rogue, this deck is incredible, it is not easy to play definitely, but strong, like really strong. 

Miracle rogue is always a great deck against slow decks (control decks most of the time), but I found this one quite successful against nowadays tier 1 decks too. 

I know I am not the player who always play at highest ranks, but this season, from rank 16 to 12, this deck is 5-1 against midrange shaman and 4-2 against malygos rogue. If I was not trying to play freeze mage (and fail miserably), I would probably be at higher ranks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2016 at 8:15 PM, FanOfValeera said:

This deck is incredible, it is not easy to play definitely, but strong, like really strong. 

I feel like this is a sentiment that is expressed on SO many Rogue decks. It's crazy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Blainie said:

I feel like this is a sentiment that is expressed on SO many Rogue decks. It's crazy!

Maybe because it is true :)

But you're right, so many people, ones that play it especially, think rogue is a complicated class. it is rewarding if you can master it, as it has good matchups all over the place (except shaman most of the time), and frustrating if you can't, as you just lose and lose for decades.

My ten game win streak with this deck was just stopped by a wall shaman, to be more specific Yogg-Saron, Hope's End. Turned my 4 minions into either sheep or boar and kill them one by one with Shadow Strikes, turned itself into a 8/11 taunt, then hit me in the face for 8 with 2 Eviscerates. It felt like going up against another rogue deck for a moment.

After all this time, I feel like I am starting the grasp the idea of miracle rogue archetype, and it feels really good.

 

Also, why Blizzard wouldn't nerf this card in a way that it can only cast spells from the class of the player who plays it. Maybe, that would make the card less cancerous.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Zadina
      The lore of The Boomsday Project begins to unfold in this digital comic!
      Dr. Boom is the star of Hearthstone's upcoming expansion and it's time to take an inside look into his labs. What are his motivations? Who are the scientists helping him? And who is his greatest love, apart from himself? You can find all of this if you read here.

      The comic reveals the names for the Legendary minions for Hunter and Priest: Boommaster Flark and Zerek the Cloner. Their names definitely provide small hints about the card abilities. According to the reveal schedule teasers, the latter might be revealed on the 27th of July. Stay tuned, as the reveal season begins tomorrow with the reveal livestream!
    • By positiv2
      This is a list of Questions for Hearthstone sorted by their category. Any feedback and suggestions are very welcome.
      Hearthstone Common Questions
      Constructed
      Should I play Standard or Wild in Hearthstone? Economy
      Can Hearthstone daily quests be completed in Practice mode? Is there a way to trade cards with other players in Hearthstone? What are the rewards from Hearthstone Ranked Chests? What Hearthstone packs to buy? Where to get cards in Hearthstone? Where to spend gold in Hearthstone? Where to start in Hearthstone? Which Hearthstone cards to disenchant? Tavern Brawl
      When is Tavern Brawl open in Hearthstone? Technical
      Can Hearthstone be played offline? How do I multibox in Hearthstone? Why can't I use my Standard Hearthstone deck in Standard mode? Other
      Are there achievements in Hearthstone? What decides who goes first in Hearthstone? Where to change card back in Hearthstone? Which Hearthstone class is the best?
    • By positiv2
      Hearthstone's main constructed modes are Wild and Standard. While Wild allows for all cards that were released in a constructed set, Standard decks can only utilise cards that were printed during this or previous year, alongside Classic and Basic sets.
      Occasionally, a deck is not available for Standard play even when it should be. You need to make sure Standard is selected as the deckbuilding mode, as even when the deck contains only Standard cards, it has to be set to Standard before it can be used. When wild is used, the artwork for the collection changes slightly. You can change the mode when you open the deck in your collection, hover over or tap its "header" and select Convert to Standard. If the deck is already set to Standard, you will see Convert to Wild instead.

      If the deck contained any Wild cards, their colour will change to Red. These cards need to be swapped for Standard cards before the deck can be used in standard.

      If this does not help, restarting Hearthstone should fix the issue.
    • By Stan
      Here's a roundup of all Midgame Moves for Hearthstone that have been published last week. The series is aimed at educating players and covers a variety of topics.
      Table of Contents 
      Part One: Do I Have Lethal? Part Two: Am I Dead? Part Three: Reading Your Opponent Part Four: When the Plan Falls Apart Part Five: Playing to Your Outs Part One: Do I Have Lethal? [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)
      Welcome to Midgame Week! Previously, during Opening Moves Week, we looked at how Hearthstone pros navigate the first phase of the game—everything from choosing your win condition and building a deck to how to mulligan or play your first turns. In Midgame Week, we dissect the sequence of decisions a pro player makes each turn as they look to advance to the late game—and victory.
      The first question you should ask yourself every turn in the midgame is one that will come as no surprise to Hearthstone aficionados—can I win right now? Do I have lethal? To dig into that, we asked Raymond “rayC” Cipoletti of Panda Global for advice.
      “Frequently, even at the highest levels of play, we see players missing lethal,” rayC says. “Whether it’s an easy lethal or the most complex puzzle in Hearthstone, there are steps you should take every turn to ensure nothing is missed.”
      The first step? Take a deep breath. “You need to slow down,” rayC says. “The most common reason for missing lethal is simply playing too fast. Take your time to analyze the board state.”
      Once you’ve done this, run through your choices. “Think about every single option at your disposal—especially if your opponent is low on Health,” rayC says. “Go through every scenario with the cards you have in hand. You have until the rope starts to burn to make your actions, so make use of that time!”
      Accounting for your outs is important, too. “When I play any given turn, I treat it like a math problem,” rayC says. “Remember order of operations from math class? Sequencing applies to every turn of Hearthstone.” Sequencing is a skill players must work at constantly, but rayC suggests doing things like drawing cards once you’ve established you don’t already have lethal before taking any other actions.
      Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, check your work. “When you finally spot lethal, re-count it,” rayC says. “Make sure the math adds up. You never want to commit to a play only to realize you were off, and potentially lose because of it.”
      Part Two: Am I Dead? [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)

      To figure out whether your opponent is about to end the game is tricky. You have to evaluate the current board state, your opponent’s hand, what (if anything) you can do to prevent them from winning, and how that will impact your own game plan. For such a challenge, we asked the inimitable Edwin “HotMEOWTH” Cook—winner of the 2016 Americas Summer Championship—for help.
      Evaluating these variables is difficult, but sometimes your opponent will give you information. “It’s important to know when your opponent is showing signs of aggression or making riskier plays that might be setting up lethal,” HotMEOWTH says. “In a scenario where you are suspicious of your opponent setting up lethal the following turn, it’s important to track the cards they have left in their hand, cards left in their deck, and how much mana they will have available to figure out how much damage they can possibly do.”
      “One trick to find out if your opponent can kill you next turn is to track their hand and see if there are cards they have held for more than a few turns,” HotMEOWTH says. “If so, they might be holding onto dangerous burn spells or combo pieces.” (Hand-tracking is a skill unto itself, and the focus of tomorrow’s Midgame Week entry—so check back for that!)
      Mana considerations are hugely important as well. “Oftentimes, your opponent could have more than enough damage to win the game, but not enough mana to utilize all of those cards. Keep in mind whether you have to make the safest play—even if your opponent has held a few cards for a long time,” HotMEOWTH says. That’s especially great advice for facing off against aggressive decks.
      “If your opponent isn’t holding any specific cards, it’s still important to keep track of what’s left in their deck,” HotMEOWTH says. “What are the odds of them drawing a card that would allow them to win? Ask yourself whether you can afford to play safe and prevent it or not.” (We’ll also talk more about the strategy of playing to your outs later in Midgame Week.)
      Finally, your own Health is a crucial consideration. “When you’re facing opponents that are playing decks that can burst you down from a high Health total, it’s important to count the maximum damage they can do with their combos,” HotMEOWTH says. “For example, Druids can unleash large chunks of damage using Savage Roar with just a few minions on the board." If facing off against such a deck, he suggests playing minions with Taunt and making trades accordingly.
      Part Three: Reading Your Opponent [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)

      While you’ve been navigating the game—thinking every turn about whether you have lethal or if you can survive your opponent’s next turn—you also should be monitoring the state of your opponent’s hand and deck. Matthijs “Theo” Lieftink, a two-time representative of The Netherlands in the Hearthstone Global Games (HGG), has strong advice for anyone looking to improve their hand-reading skills, including how to bluff your opponent’s reads.
      “Hand-reading is an important part of pro-level play, and you can get an edge if you are doing it better than your opponent,” Theo says. His advice? “Keep track of how many cards your opponent keeps in the mulligan.” If they’re still holding one of those cards into the midgame, it’s probably a critical tech card or a high-value element of their strategy. Of course, “It depends on what your opponent is playing,” Theo adds.
      To learn hand-reading, he suggests thinking about what the absolute best play could have been every turn. If your opponent didn’t make the optimal play—for example, playing a Flamestrike on turn seven to clear your board of four-Health minions—that tells you that they probably didn’t have the tools to do so.
      Countering your opponent’s hand-reading is the next level of difficulty. “Bluffing that you do or don’t have a certain card can be done in several ways,” Theo says. He suggests making plays that suggest a specific follow-up for your next turn is in-hand, whether you’re holding it or not. “The same thing can be done the other way around—making worse plays to pretend you don’t have a certain card in hand.” He’s quick to point out, however, that this can be risky—your opponent might play around the card you’re hiding anyway. “It’s important to know when you can afford to bluff,” he says. “Making ‘worse’ plays to set something up can always backfire.”
      A special thanks to Theo for his continued provision of expert advice! Hand-reading is an enormously difficult skill to learn, and it’s one that even the best players continue to work at every day.
      Part Four: When the Plan Falls Apart [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)

      You had a grand plan. It was perfect. A flawless combination all but set up, waiting for that last crucial card—and then you realize that your opponent will win, unless you expend one of your key cards to stay in the game. Fear not! All is not necessarily lost, and Esteban “AKAWonder” Serrano of SK Gaming—a fixture of the European pro Hearthstone scene—will help you understand how to navigate what’s left when your deck’s win condition is scattered to the wind.
      Regardless of your deck style, AKAWonder says you must look for a new strategy if your original one has been derailed. “When you lose your win condition, you need to find an alternative plan to win the game," he says. "Most likely, your chances to win are lower than they were.” But so long as they aren't zero, you have a chance. He suggests looking for every point of win percentage you can, by any means possible.
      “In order to find an alternative plan, I think about different situations—denying my opponent their win condition, going to fatigue, or just creating pressure using minions,” AKAWonder says. He adds that certain cards can offer new outs all their own, like The Lich King.
      It’s not always easy, but practice helps. He says, “You need to find a new way to win—and the more you play a deck, the more alternative game plans you will discover for different matchups.” If you’re newer to Hearthstone, he says this is actually a valuable lesson to learn: “Your win condition is important, but not if you lose with it in your hand. Go for an alternative plan if the situation forces you to!”
      Sounds like AKAWonder recommends a whole string of keywords: you need to Discover new ways to play and Adapt to the situation! Every game is different, so playing with that in mind just makes sense.
      Part Five: Playing to Your Outs [Return to Top]
      Blizzard (Source)

      There’s a surprisingly wide gulf between winning and not losing yet. A very kind Jace “DrJikininki” Garthright, best known for his 2017 Americas Winter Playoffs victory, lends us his guidance today to distinguish between the two, helping you to “play to your outs”—making sure you’re still working towards a game-winning play.
      “It’s important to ask yourself every turn—how can I win this game?” DrJikininki says. “Some games, you may have a very slim chance to win, but recognizing when you are in that situation and adapting is a very important skill.” He cautions against what may seem instinctual, which is to make the "safe" play each turn. “All players have a tendency to make plays that would be considered safer,” he says. “Plays as simple as trading into minions on the board to live for an extra turn.”
      But the concept of playing to live isn’t how you should play. “Use critical thinking about the potential reach in your opponent’s deck,” DrJikininki says. “Taking slim percentage chances is what you have to do sometimes!” His advice makes sense—evaluating how a given line of play sets you up to win later is incredibly important.
      Getting there takes time, so DrJikininki echoes what others have said: practice. “Next time you play a game and are in a losing position, ask yourself—what hands can you beat? What play with your hand leads to you winning the most often? This will help you out more than just playing a large number of games.” He notes that understanding the variables—your deck’s reach, your opponent’s deck’s reach, whether or not either deck can afford to play a value game, and more—all factor into those questions.
      That’s it! We hope you’ve enjoyed this series of educational snippets from pro players across the competitive Hearthstone landscape, and that Midgame Week inspires you to take your game to the next level.
      Which of this week’s skills do you think is most important? What advice would you offer other players looking to learn more about how to level up their play? Offer up your thoughts in the comments and stay tuned for even more pro player insight right here on playhearthstone.com/esports.
    • By Stan
      Blizzard posted changes to game mechanics that will be implemented with with the Boomsday Project 12.0 patch.
      Highlights
      Ghostly Charger will no longer have the Beast tag. Ixlid, Fungal Lord is losing the Elemental tag. Shifter Zerus, Molten Blade, and Shifting Scroll will no longer keep any enchantments when they transform. Voodoo Doll's curse will be broken if you transform the minion that's already been cursed by Voodoo Doll. The transformed (formerly cursed) minion will not be killed when Voodoo Doll dies. Shadowboxer will be updated to deal 1 damage to a random enemy, whenever a minion is healed. Players will be able to disenchant the card for its full Arcane Dust value for two weeks after 12.0 goes live. Blizzard (Source)
      Dr. Boom’s bringing more than just mayhem to the Netherstorm. The 12.0 update will also come with several rule changes to Hearthstone’s gameplay. Read on to learn about another minion Type update, the copy a card rule change and the transform rule change.
      More Minion Type Changes
      There was a ton of feedback following the last minion Type update we posted, and after reviewing all of it, we realized that there were a couple more minions that needed changing. Here are our decisions following the full review of your feedback.
      Ghostly Charger

      We made a decision that, at least by default, spectral/undead/ghost/spirit versions of animals are not considered Beasts in Hearthstone. There are quite a lot of these sort of cards, most of which are already not Beasts, and changing them would have extensive balance implications.
      Ghostly Charger is one of those cards. Clearly a ghost in both its name and art, its Beast tag has also not been relevant in any significantly used interaction. As a result, we’re planning to remove the Beast tag in a future update.
      In the much rarer case of spectral/undead/ghost/spirit versions of Dragons, Murlocs, Pirates, and Elementals, they will still remain their Type. There aren’t a whole lot of these cards, but there are a few, and they’re already consistently their type. Examples of these are Ghost Light Angler, Cursed Castaway, Bone Drake.
      Ixlid, Fungal Lord

      World of Warcraft uses a looser definition of Elemental than what we decided to standardize on for Hearthstone. In Hearthstone, an elemental is something that has been brought to life by being inhabited by an elemental spirit, but is otherwise not alive. These are easy to recognize: a Fire Elemental looks like a living creature made out of fire; A Water Elemental looks like a living creature made out of water.
      One of the biggest outliers to this definition are plant creatures. There are a ton of minions in Hearthstone that are some sort of plant. We’ve decided that these do not count as Elementals in Hearthstone. Examples of these include The Voraxx, Fen Creeper, Biteweed, Vilespine Slayer, Rotten Applebaum.
      Ixlid, Fungal Lord, is by this definition, a plant creature. Although we’re committed to consistency, there are also other criteria that we consider when changing card Types. One of them is how often a card’s current Type matters when it comes to interacting with other cards. Ixlid’s Elemental tag is not significantly used in current decks, so we’ve decided to remove it in a future update.
      We also looked at the following minions but decided against making any changes. We’ve included our thought process as to how we came to our decisions with these cards.
      Kindly Grandmother
      Kindly Grandmother/Big Bad Wolf looks like a Worgen (which are not considered Beasts) but is actually some other sort of wolf-like creature that is a Beast. The Beast tag is also extremely relevant to its gameplay, and defines most of the card’s intended usage. With this in mind, we will not be changing Kindly Grandmother’s/Big Bad Wolf’s Type. In the future, we’ll be more careful to make the art clear when it comes to Worgen or similar races.
      Arcane Giant  & Arcane Golem
      On top of Elementals and plant creatures, there’s another category of things that have been brought to life via magical animation. These are creatures like War Golem, Arcane Giant, and Avian Watcher—which are not Elementals.
      Arcane Giant, Arcane Golem, and The Curator are all examples of another sort of creature collectively referred to as Arcane Golems. These mechanical constructs utilize arcane energy as a power source, with The Curator being a Mech Type as part of his character in the One Night in Karazhan Adventure. This is actually subtly different from something like War Golem, which is carved from stone and then magically animated. While the “golem” definition refers to something that has been magically animated and is therefore neither a Mech nor Elemental, both Arcane Giant and Arcane Golem’s card art don’t clearly show them to be one or the other. Since the correct type for these creatures is so unclear, we will be leaving them unchanged for now, but would love to hear what you think.
      Bogshaper
      Bogshaper seems to be the same type of creature as Ixlid or Fen Creeper, and that would logically lead to removal of its Elemental tag. However, as mentioned above, we look at more than just the fantasy of a card when determining if it needs a Type change. While Bogshaper’s fantasy criteria checkbox is filled, it’s currently heavily utilized in the meta, and features in many decks, including that of the 2018 Summer Champion, Bunnyhoppor.
      We are holding off on changing Bogshaper's Type for now, but would love to hear what the community thinks we should do in this case. We’re also considering making this sort of change when a card rotates to Wild.
      Copy A Card Rule Change

      Card copies currently only retain enchantments when both the original card and its copy are in play—think Molten Reflection. In Update 12.0, this rule will be updated to match the one regarding enchantments being retained when a card transitions zones.
      Zones in Hearthstone are defined as areas where cards are hosted: your deck, your hand, in play, and in the graveyard. In Hearthstone, there is a general forward-moving flow through zones. Whenever a card moves forward in that flow (Deck -> Hand, Hand -> Play, Deck -> Play), it retains enchantments. If a card moves backwards in zones (Play -> Hand, Hand -> Deck, Play -> Deck, Play/Hand/Deck -> Graveyard and Graveyard -> Play/Hand/Deck), it loses enchantments.
      With this update, card copies will retain enchantments in the following scenarios.
      Cards that are resurrected currently do not and will continue not to retain any enchantments, unless specifically stated otherwise. If you copy a card from a deck to a deck, the copy retains enchantments. (eg. Archbishop Benedictus) If you copy a card from a hand to a hand, the copy retains enchantments. (eg. Mind Vision) If you copy a card from play to play, the copy retains enchantments. (eg. Molten Reflection) If you copy a card from a deck to a hand, the copy retains enchantments. (eg. Thoughtsteal) If you copy a card from a deck to play, the copy retains enchantments. (eg. Mindgames) If you copy a card from hand to play, the copy retains enchantments. (eg. Kobold Illusionist) Transform Rule Change
      When transformed, a Hearthstone card typically loses all of its enchantment. Most cards in game already obey this rule. However, there are four cards that we are changing to keep in line with the rule, as part of this consistency pass.

      Shifter Zerus, Molten Blade, and Shifting Scroll all transform in your hand at the start of every turn. Following the 12.0 update, they will no longer keep any enchantments when they transform. This includes things like hand buffs and Emperor Thaurissan mana-cost discounts.

      The impact on Voodoo Doll is a little different with the update. If you transform the minion that’s already been cursed by Voodoo Doll, the curse will be broken, and the transformed (and formerly cursed) minion will not be killed when Voodoo Doll dies. Silencing the cursed minion will also break the curse, in addition to silencing the Voodoo Doll.
      Shadowboxer Update

      Since the creation of the Lifesteal keyword, Shadowboxer has been a high risk card, in that it can trigger off of itself and deal up to 30 damage in one turn if you ever give it Lifesteal. Because of this, we have changed it to: Whenever a minion is healed, deal 1 damage to a random enemy.
      Once Shadowboxer's card change is live with Update 12.0, players will be able to disenchant it for its full Arcane Dust value for two weeks.
      These are all the changes that you’ll see come into effect with Update 12.0, in line with our commitment to consistency within the game. Let us know what you think in the comments below, or via Facebook and Twitter!